hull

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: Hull and hüll

English[edit]

Wikipedia has articles on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English hul (seed covering), from Old English hulu (seed covering), from Proto-Germanic *hul- (compare Dutch hul (hood), German Hülle, Hülse (cover, veil)), perhaps from Proto-Indo-European *ḱel- (to cover, hide); or possibly from Proto-Indo-European *kal- (hard) (compare Old Irish calad, calath (hard), Latin callus, callum (rough skin), Old Church Slavonic калити (kaliti, to cool, harden)). For the sense development, compare French coque (nutshell; ship's hull), Ancient Greek φάσηλος (phásēlos, bean pod; yacht).

Noun[edit]

hull (plural hulls)

  1. The outer covering of a fruit or seed
Synonyms[edit]
  • (outer covering of fruit or seed): husk, shell
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

hull (third-person singular simple present hulls, present participle hulling, simple past and past participle hulled)

  1. To remove the outer covering of a fruit or seed.
    She sat on the back porch hulling peanuts.
Synonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Origin uncertain; perhaps the same word as Etymology 1, above.

Noun[edit]

hull (plural hulls)

  1. The body or frame of a vessel, such as a ship or plane.
    • 1667, John Dryden, Annus Mirabilis, Quatrain 60, 1808, The Works of John Dryden, Volume 9, page 115,
      Deep in their hulls our deadly bullets light, / And through the yielding planks a passage find.
  2. (mathematics, geometry, of a set A) The smallest set that possesses a particular property (such as convexity) and contains every point of A; slightly more formally, the intersection of all sets which possess the specified property and of which A is a subset.
    The orthogonal convex hull of an orthogonal polygon is the smallest orthogonally convex polygon that encloses the original polygon.
    holomorphically convex hull; affine hull; injective hull

Synonyms[edit]

  • (frame of a vessel): fuselage (of a winged aircraft)
  • (smallest set containing a given set of points): span

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

hull (third-person singular simple present hulls, present participle hulling, simple past and past participle hulled)

  1. (obsolete, intransitive, nautical) To drift; to be carried by the impetus of wind or water on the ship's hull alone, with sails furled.
  2. (transitive) To hit (a ship) in the hull with cannon fire etc.
    • 1774, George Shelvocke, The Voyage of Captain Shelvock Round the World in David Henry (ed.), An Historical Account of All the Voyages Round the World, Performed by English Navigators, London: F. Newbery, Volume 2, p. 163,[3]
      During this action, we had not a man killed or wounded, although the enemy often hulled us, and once, in particular, a shot coming into one of our ports, dismounted one of our guns between decks []

Estonian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Finnic *hullu. Cognate to Finnish hullu and Livonian ull.

Adjective[edit]

hull (genitive hullu, partitive hullu)

  1. crazy, mad

Declension[edit]


Hungarian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

hull

  1. (intransitive) to fall
    Hull a hó.It's snowing. (Literally: The snow is falling.)
    térdre hullto fall on one's knees
  2. (of tears) to flow
  3. (of hair) to fall out
  4. (intransitive) to die
    Hullanak, mint a legyek.They are dying off like flies.

Conjugation[edit]

or

Derived terms[edit]

(With verbal prefixes):


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse hól

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

hull n (definite singular hullet, indefinite plural hull or huller, definite plural hulla or hullene)

  1. a hole
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

hull

  1. imperative of hulle

See also[edit]

References[edit]