fruit

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See also: Fruit

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English frute, fruit, fruct, fruyt, frut (fruits and vegetables), from Old French fruit (produce, fruits and vegetables), from Latin fructus (enjoyment, proceeds, profits, produce, income) and frūx (crop, produce, fruit) (compare Latin fruor (have the benefit of, to use, to enjoy)), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰruHg- (to make use of, to have enjoyment of). Cognate with English brook (to bear, tolerate) and German brauchen (to need). Displaced native Middle English ovet ("fruit", from Old English ofett; see English ovest), Middle English wastom, wastum ("fruit, growth", from Old English wæstm), and Middle English blede ("fruit, flower, offspring", from Old English blēd; see English blead), English brook.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fruit (countable and uncountable, plural fruits) (see Usage notes for discussion of plural)

  1. (often in the plural) In general, a product of plant growth useful to man or animals.
  2. Specifically, a sweet, edible part of a plant that resembles seed-bearing fruit (see next sense), even if it does not develop from a floral ovary; also used in a technically imprecise sense for some sweet or sweetish vegetables, such as the petioles of rhubarb, that resemble a true fruit or are used in cookery as if they were a fruit.
  3. (botany) A product of fertilization in a plant, specifically:
    1. The seed-bearing part of a plant, often edible, colourful and fragrant, produced from a floral ovary after fertilization.
    2. The spores of cryptogams and their accessory organs.
    • 1640, John Parkinson, Theatrum botanicum: the Theater of Plants; or, An Herball of a Large Extent, London, page 1063:
      [A]fter the flower is past commeth the fruit in long pods, every seede bunching out like the pods of Orobus and as bigge almost as the smaller Pease.
  4. An end result, effect, or consequence; advantageous or disadvantageous result.
    His long nights in the office eventually bore fruit when his business boomed and he was given a raise.
  5. (attributive) Of, belonging to, related to, or having fruit or its characteristics; (of living things) producing or consuming fruit.
    the fresh-squeezed fruit juice; a fruit salad; an artificial fruit flavor; a fruit tree; a fruit bat
  6. (dated, colloquial, derogatory) A homosexual man; (derogatory, figuratively) an effeminate man. [1900]
  7. (archaic) Offspring from a sexual union.
    Blessed art thou amongst women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb.
    The litter was the fruit of the union between our whippet and their terrier.

Usage notes[edit]

  • In the botanical and figurative senses, fruit is usually treated as uncountable:
    a bowl of fruit; eat plenty of fruit; the tree provides fruit.
  • fruits is also sometimes used as the plural in the botanical sense:
    berries, achenes, and nuts are all fruits; the fruits of this plant split into two parts.
  • When fruit is treated as uncountable in the botanical sense, a piece of fruit is often used as a singulative.
  • In senses other than the botanical or figurative ones derived from the botanical sense, the plural is fruits.
  • The culinary sense often does not cover true fruits that are savoury or used chiefly in savoury foods, such as tomatoes and peas. These are normally described simply as vegetables.

Derived terms[edit]

Terms derived from fruit (noun)

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Bislama: frut
  • Jamaican Creole: fruut
  • Japanese: フルーツ (furūtsu)

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Verb[edit]

fruit (third-person singular simple present fruits, present participle fruiting, simple past and past participle fruited)

  1. To produce fruit, seeds, or spores.
    • 1910, Canada Experimental Farms Service, Report of the Dominion Experimental Farms:
      It may be said, however, that the percentage of green apples among the Fameuse seedlings is much less than among the others as out of 33 Fameuse seedlings which had fruited up to this year, none was green and we recollect but one light coloured Fameuse seedling fruiting this year.
    • 1998, Randy Molina & David Pilz, Managing Forest Ecosystems to Conserve Fungus Diversity and Sustain Wild Mushroom Harvests, →ISBN, page 10:
      For example, chanterelles and russulas can start fruiting in early to mid summer given sufficient moisture, but other species, such as matsutake, rarely fruit until temperatures cool in the autumn, even if moisture is available earlier.
    • 2014, David Mitchell, The Bone Clocks, →ISBN, page 12:
      The grass and weeds come up to my waist and the plum trees are already fruiting up, though most of the fruit'll go to the wasps and the worms, Vinny says, 'cause he can't be arsed to pick it.

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Catalan Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ca

Etymology[edit]

From Old Occitan [Term?], from Latin fructus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fruit m (plural fruits)

  1. fruit

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch fruut, froyt, from Old French fruit.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fruit n (uncountable)

  1. fruit (produced by trees or bushes, or any sweet vegetable)

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French fruict, alteration of Old French fruit, from Latin frūctus (enjoyment, proceeds, profits, produce, income), a derivative of fruor (have the benefit of, to use, to enjoy), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰrug- (to make use of, to have enjoyment of).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fruit m (plural fruits)

  1. fruit

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Haitian Creole: fwi

Further reading[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Noun[edit]

fruit (uncountable)

  1. Alternative form of frute

Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin fructus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fruit m (oblique plural fruiz or fruitz, nominative singular fruiz or fruitz, nominative plural fruit)

  1. fruit

Descendants[edit]