carpo

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: Carpo, carpo-, and -carpo

Aromanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Greek καρπός (karpós).

Noun[edit]

carpo m

  1. fruit
  2. harvest

Synonyms[edit]


Galician[edit]

Noun[edit]

carpo m (plural carpos)

  1. (anatomy) carpus (entire wrist)
  2. (anatomy) carpal (any bone of the wrist)

Related terms[edit]


Italian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈkar.po/
  • Rhymes: -arpo
  • Hyphenation: càr‧po

Etymology 1[edit]

Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia it

From Ancient Greek καρπός (karpós).

Noun[edit]

carpo m (plural carpi)

  1. (anatomy) carpus
Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • carpo in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

Etymology 2[edit]

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb[edit]

carpo

  1. first-person singular present indicative of carpare

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Italic *karpō, from Proto-Indo-European *kerp-.

Compare Greek καρπός (karpós, fruit) and κείρω (keírō, to cut off), English harvest, sharp, shear.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

carpō (present infinitive carpere, perfect active carpsī, supine carptum); third conjugation

  1. (literally) I pluck, pick, harvest
    • 8 CE, Ovid, Metamorphoses 9.380–381:
      Stāgna tamen timeat, nec carpat ab arbore flōrēs,
      et fruticēs omnēs corpus putet esse deārum.
      May he fear the ponds, and may he not pick flowers from the trees,
      and may he think all trees to be bodies of goddesses.
  2. I tear off, tear out, rend
    • c. 90 CE, Valerius Flaccus, Argonautica 8.7–8:
      [] crīnemque genāsque
      aegra per antīquī carpsit vestīgia somnī.
      [] and she tore off her hair and her cheeks,
      sorrowful, amid the traces of her previous sleep.
    • c. 400 CE, Prudentius, Liber Peristephanon 10.694–695:
      Oculī parentis pūnientur ācrius
      quam sī cruentae membra carpant ungulae.
      The parent's eyes are more intensely punished
      than if bloody nails were to tear at the body.
  3. (textiles) I spin
  4. I make good use of, enjoy something (usually a period of time)
    • 23 BCE – 13 BCE, Horace, Odes 1.11.6–8:
      Sapiās, vīna liquēs, et spatiō brevī
      spem longam resecēs. Dum loquimur, fūgerit invida
      aetās: carpe diem, quam minimum crēdula posterō.
      Be wise, make wine, and in a short time,
      lose any great hope. As we speak, time is cruelly fleeing away.
      Enjoy the day, believing the least in the future.
    • 29 BCE – 19 BCE, Virgil, Aeneid 7.413–414:
      Tēctīs hīc Turnus in altīs
      iam mediam nigrā carpēbat nocte quiētem.
      Here and now, in a high floor, Turnus
      was enjoying his rest in the middle of the dark night.
    • c. 90 CE, Valerius Flaccus, Argonautica 5.48:
      Carpere sēcūrās quis iam iubet Aesona noctēs?
      Who is now telling Aeson to enjoy his peaceful nights?
  5. I revile, criticize, slander, carp at
    • c. 84 BCE – 54 BCE, Catullus, Carmina 62:
      At lubet innūptīs fīctō tē carpere questū.
      Quid tum, sī carpunt, tacitā quem mente requīrunt?
      But maidens like to chide with feigned complaint. What then, if they chide him, whom they desire in their secret heart?
    • 27 BCE – 25 BCE, Titus Livius, Ab urbe condita libri 45.35.5:
      Paulum, cui ipsī quoque sē conparāre ērubuissent, obtrectātiõ carpsit.
      Criticism reviled Paulus, a man that people would have blushed to compare themselves to.
  6. (military) I weaken, harass an enemy
    • c. 48 BCE, Julius Caesar, Commentarii de Bello Civili 1.63:
      Relinquēbātur Caesarī nihil, nisi uti equitātū agmen adversāriōrum male habēret et carperet.
      No option remained to Cesar, other than annoying and weakening the enemy army with the cavalry.

Conjugation[edit]

   Conjugation of carpō (third conjugation)
indicative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present carpō carpis carpit carpimus carpitis carpunt
imperfect carpēbam carpēbās carpēbat carpēbāmus carpēbātis carpēbant
future carpam carpēs carpet carpēmus carpētis carpent
perfect carpsī carpsistī carpsit carpsimus carpsistis carpsērunt, carpsēre
pluperfect carpseram carpserās carpserat carpserāmus carpserātis carpserant
future perfect carpserō carpseris carpserit carpserimus carpseritis carpserint
passive present carpor carperis, carpere carpitur carpimur carpiminī carpuntur
imperfect carpēbar carpēbāris, carpēbāre carpēbātur carpēbāmur carpēbāminī carpēbantur
future carpar carpēris, carpēre carpētur carpēmur carpēminī carpentur
perfect carptus + present active indicative of sum
pluperfect carptus + imperfect active indicative of sum
future perfect carptus + future active indicative of sum
subjunctive singular plural
first second third first second third
active present carpam carpās carpat carpāmus carpātis carpant
imperfect carperem carperēs carperet carperēmus carperētis carperent
perfect carpserim carpserīs carpserit carpserīmus carpserītis carpserint
pluperfect carpsissem carpsissēs carpsisset carpsissēmus carpsissētis carpsissent
passive present carpar carpāris, carpāre carpātur carpāmur carpāminī carpantur
imperfect carperer carperēris, carperēre carperētur carperēmur carperēminī carperentur
perfect carptus + present active subjunctive of sum
pluperfect carptus + imperfect active subjunctive of sum
imperative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present carpe carpite
future carpitō carpitō carpitōte carpuntō
passive present carpere carpiminī
future carpitor carpitor carpuntor
non-finite forms active passive
present perfect future present perfect future
infinitives carpere carpsisse carptūrum esse carpī carptum esse carptum īrī
participles carpēns carptūrus carptus carpendus, carpundus
verbal nouns gerund supine
genitive dative accusative ablative accusative ablative
carpendī carpendō carpendum carpendō carptum carptū

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • carpo in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • carpo in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • carpo in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • carpo in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to harass the rear: novissimos carpere
  • carpo in The Perseus Project (1999) Perseus Encyclopedia[2]

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek καρπός (karpós, wrist).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

carpo m (plural carpos)

  1. (anatomy) carpus
  2. wrist
    Synonyms: punho, pulso

Meronyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin carpus, from Ancient Greek καρπός (karpós, wrist).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈkaɾpo/, [ˈkaɾ.po]
  • Rhymes: -aɾpo
  • Hyphenation: car‧po

Noun[edit]

carpo m (plural carpos)

  1. carpus
  2. (anatomy) wrist
    Synonym: muñeca

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]