spin

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See also: Spin

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /spɪn/
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪn

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English spinnen, from Old English spinnan, from Proto-Germanic *spinnaną, from Proto-Indo-European *(s)penh₁-. Compare Low German spinnen, Dutch spinnen, German spinnen, Danish spinde, Swedish spinna.

Verb[edit]

spin (third-person singular simple present spins, present participle spinning, simple past and past participle spun or (nonstandard) span or (nonstandard) spinned)

  1. (ergative) To rotate, revolve, gyrate (usually quickly); to partially or completely rotate to face another direction.
    I spun myself around a few times.
    Spin the ball on the floor.
    She spun around and gave him a big smile.
    1. (aviation, of an aircraft) To enter, or remain in, a spin (abnormal stalled flight mode).
    2. (aviation, of a pilot) To cause one's aircraft to enter or remain in a spin (abnormal stalled flight mode).
    • 1855, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, “Hiawatha’s Fasting”, in The Song of Hiawatha, Boston: Ticknor and Fields, page 76:
      Round about him spun the landscape, / Sky and forest reeled together, / And his strong heart leaped within him, / As the sturgeon leaps and struggles / In a net to break its meshes.
  2. (transitive) To make yarn by twisting and winding fibers together.
    They spin the cotton into thread.
    • 1718, Matthew Prior, “Solomon on the Vanity of the World”, in Poems on Several Occasions, volume II, Dublin: George Grierson, published 1738, book I, page 115:
      Along the Sunny Bank, or Wat’ry Mead, / Ten thouſand Stalks their various Bloſſoms ſpread : / Peaceful and lowly in their native Soil, / They neither know to ſpin, nor care to toil ; / Yet with confeſs’d Magnificence deride / Our vile Attire, and Impotence of Pride.
  3. (figuratively) To present, describe, or interpret, or to introduce a bias or slant, so as to give something a favorable or advantageous appearance.
    Synonyms: whitewash, sugarcoat, put lipstick on, gild, blandish, dress up
    • 2006 February 9, “The Politics of Science”, in The Washington Post[1], page A22:
      In every administration there will be spokesmen and public affairs officers who try to spin the news to make the president look good. But this administration is trying to spin scientific data and muzzle scientists toward that end.
    • 2021 July 31, Lisa Lerer; Nicholas Fandos, “Already Distorting Jan. 6, G.O.P. Now Concocts Entire Counternarrative”, in The New York Times[2], ISSN 0362-4331:
      This past week [] Republicans completed their journey through the looking-glass, spinning a new counternarrative of that deadly day.
  4. (cricket, of a bowler) To make the ball move sideways when it bounces on the pitch.
  5. (cricket, of a ball) To move sideways when bouncing.
  6. (cooking) To form into thin strips or ribbons, as with sugar
  7. To form (a web, a cocoon, silk, etc.) from threads produced by the extrusion of a viscid, transparent liquid, which hardens on coming into contact with the air; said of the spider, the silkworm, etc.
  8. To shape, as malleable sheet metal, into a hollow form, by bending or buckling it by pressing against it with a smooth hand tool or roller while the metal revolves, as in a lathe.
  9. To move swiftly.
    to spin along the road in a carriage, on a bicycle, etc.
  10. To stream or issue in a thread or a small current or jet.
    Blood spins from a vein.
  11. (computing, programming, intransitive) To wait in a loop until some condition becomes true.
  12. (transitive, informal) To play (vinyl records, etc.) as a disc jockey.
    • 2002, CMJ New Music Report (volume 70, number 12)
      However, for the past six years he has been spinning his novel blend of progressive house and trance music and is finally on the brink of becoming the next luminary DJ.
  13. (cycling, intransitive)
    1. To use an exercise bicycle, especially as part of a gym class.
    2. To ride a bicycle at a fast cadence.
  14. (UK, law enforcement, slang, transitive) To search rapidly.
    • 2013, Nick Oldham, Psycho Alley
      But then again, unless someone struck lucky in those first few hours, there weren't even enough detectives to spin a drum [house].
Hypernyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.
See also[edit]

Noun[edit]

spin (countable and uncountable, plural spins)

  1. Rapid circular motion.
    The car went into a spin.
    The skaters demonstrated their spins.
    He put some spin on the cue ball.
  2. (physics) A quantum angular momentum associated with subatomic particles, which also creates a magnetic moment.
  3. (countable, uncountable) A favourable comment or interpretation intended to bias opinion on an otherwise unpleasant situation.
    Try to put a positive spin on the disappointing sales figures.
    The politician was mocked in the press for his reliance on spin rather than facts.
    • 2022 January 26, Paul Stephen, “Network News: Government's IRP claims condemned as "dishonest"”, in RAIL, number 949, page 7:
      He added: "We've always had spin, especially from Government. But this is not spin. This is dishonesty and so it's our rail media's urgent responsibility to call it out because non-specialist journalists across the country will report this and gradually these untruths will be accepted.
    Synonym: propaganda
  4. (sports) Rotation of the ball as it flies through the air; sideways movement of the ball as it bounces.
  5. (aviation) A condition of flight where a stalled aircraft is simultaneously pitching, yawing and rolling in a spinning motion.
  6. (mechanical engineering) An abnormal condition in journal bearings where the bearing seizes to the rotating shaft and rotates inside the journal, destroying both the shaft and the journal.
  7. A brief trip by vehicle, especially one made for pleasure.
    I'm off out for a spin in my new sports car.
    • 2020 December 2, Paul Bigland, “My weirdest and wackiest Rover yet”, in Rail, page 68:
      Time is running out, so I renounce a spin on a Class 387 for a fast run to Paddington on another Class 800 - a shame as the weather was perfect for pictures. Even so, it's enjoyable - boy, can those trains shift under the wires.
  8. A bundle of spun material; a mass of strands and filaments.
  9. A single play of a record by a radio station.
    • 1996, Billboard (volume 108, number 12, page 37)
      Although the Loveless title showed the smallest increase in airplay in the top 10, its number of detections outpaced the nearest bulleted title by more than 350 spins.
  10. (UK, prison slang) A search of a prisoner's cell for forbidden articles.
    • 2002, Jeffrey Archer, A Prison Diary
      Mr Weedon explains that this is a cell search - known by prisoners as a spin - and for obvious reasons it has to be carried out without any warning.
  11. (dated) An unmarried woman; a spinster.
    • 1893, Bithia Mary Croker, "To Let" in "To Let" etc., Philadelphia: J.B. Lippincott, 1906, p. 1, [3]
      Some years ago, when I was a slim young spin, I came out to India to live with my brother Tom []
  12. (uncountable) The use of an exercise bicycle, especially as part of a gym class.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

spin (plural spins)

  1. (nautical) Short for spinnaker.
    • 2021 22 April, “jdale” (username), Course for Catastrophe, chapter 4:
      “Frank!” Joe yelled. “Run the spin halyard to the cabin-top winch and pass me the free end!”

Etymology 3[edit]

Shortening of special interest.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

spin (plural spins)

  1. (informal, used among autistic people) Special interest of an autistic person.

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Dutch spinne.

Noun[edit]

spin f (plural spinnen, diminutive spinnetje n)

  1. spider, member of the order Araneae
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from English spin.

Noun[edit]

spin m (plural spins)

  1. (physics) particle spin
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Borrowed from English spin.

Noun[edit]

spin m (uncountable)

  1. political spin, media spin
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb[edit]

spin

  1. first-person singular present indicative of spinnen
  2. imperative of spinnen

Faroese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

spin n (genitive singular spins, uncountable)

  1. sperm

Declension[edit]

Declension of spin (singular only)
n3s singular
indefinite definite
nominative spin spinið
accusative spin spinið
dative spini spininum
genitive spins spinsins

Synonyms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Finnish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English spin.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈspin/, [ˈs̠pin]
  • Rhymes: -in
  • Syllabification(key): spin

Noun[edit]

spin

  1. (physics) spin

Declension[edit]

Inflection of spin (Kotus type 5/risti, no gradation)
nominative spin spinit
genitive spinin spinien
partitive spiniä spinejä
illative spiniin spineihin
singular plural
nominative spin spinit
accusative nom. spin spinit
gen. spinin
genitive spinin spinien
partitive spiniä spinejä
inessive spinissä spineissä
elative spinistä spineistä
illative spiniin spineihin
adessive spinillä spineillä
ablative spiniltä spineiltä
allative spinille spineille
essive spininä spineinä
translative spiniksi spineiksi
instructive spinein
abessive spinittä spineittä
comitative spineineen
Possessive forms of spin (type risti)
possessor singular plural
1st person spinini spinimme
2nd person spinisi spininne
3rd person spininsä

French[edit]

French Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia fr

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English spin.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

spin m (plural spins)

  1. (physics) spin

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Friulian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin spīnus.

Noun[edit]

spin m (plural spins)

  1. thorn bush

Related terms[edit]


Garo[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Cognate with Kokborok siping (sesame).

Noun[edit]

spin

  1. sesame

Hungarian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English spin.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

spin (plural spinek)

  1. (physics) spin (quantum angular momentum)

Declension[edit]

Inflection (stem in -e-, front unrounded harmony)
singular plural
nominative spin spinek
accusative spint spineket
dative spinnek spineknek
instrumental spinnel spinekkel
causal-final spinért spinekért
translative spinné spinekké
terminative spinig spinekig
essive-formal spinként spinekként
essive-modal
inessive spinben spinekben
superessive spinen spineken
adessive spinnél spineknél
illative spinbe spinekbe
sublative spinre spinekre
allative spinhez spinekhez
elative spinből spinekből
delative spinről spinekről
ablative spintől spinektől
non-attributive
possessive - singular
spiné spineké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
spinéi spinekéi
Possessive forms of spin
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. spinem spinjeim
2nd person sing. spined spinjeid
3rd person sing. spinje spinjei
1st person plural spinünk spinjeink
2nd person plural spinetek spinjeitek
3rd person plural spinjük spinjeik

References[edit]

  1. ^ Tótfalusi, István. Idegenszó-tár: Idegen szavak értelmező és etimológiai szótára (’A Storehouse of Foreign Words: an explanatory and etymological dictionary of foreign words’). Budapest: Tinta Könyvkiadó, 2005. →ISBN

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Unadapted borrowing from English spin.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈspin/
  • Rhymes: -in
  • Hyphenation: spìn

Noun[edit]

spin m (invariable)

  1. (physics) spin (an electron's quantum angular momentum)

Further reading[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Noun[edit]

spin

  1. Alternative form of spyne

Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from English spin.

Noun[edit]

spin m inan

  1. (physics) spin (quantum angular momentum)
Declension[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
adjective

Etymology 2[edit]

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Noun[edit]

spin f

  1. genitive plural of spina

Further reading[edit]

  • spin in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • spin in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Unadapted borrowing from English spin.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

spin m (plural spins)

  1. (physics) spin (quantum angular momentum of subatomic particles)

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin spīnus, from spīna, from Proto-Italic *speinā, from Proto-Indo-European *spey- (sharp point). Compare Aromanian schin.

Noun[edit]

spin m (plural spini)

  1. thorn

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Scots[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

spin (plural spins)

  1. (South Scots) Alternative form of spuin

Spanish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Unadapted borrowing from English spin.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /esˈpin/, [esˈpĩn]

Noun[edit]

spin m (plural spines)

  1. (physics) spin (quantum angular momentum of subatomic particles)

Usage notes[edit]

According to Royal Spanish Academy (RAE) prescriptions, unadapted foreign words should be written in italics in a text printed in roman type, and vice versa, and in quotation marks in a manuscript text or when italics are not available. In practice, this RAE prescription is not always followed.


West Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun[edit]

spin c (plural spinnen, diminutive spintsje)

  1. spider

Further reading[edit]

  • spin”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011