fiar

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English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

See feuar.

Noun[edit]

fiar (plural fiars)

  1. (Scotland, law) One in whom the property of an estate is vested, subject to the estate of a liferenter.
    • 1816, Walter Scott, The Black Dwarf, 1831, A Complete Edition of the Waverley Novels, Volume 13, page 108,
      I say, since ye hae sae muckle consideration for me, I'se be blithe to accept your kindness; and my mother and me (she's a life-renter, and I am fiar, o' the lands o' Wideopen) would grant you a wadset, or an heritable bond, for the siller, and to pay the annual-rent half-yearly; and Saunders Wyliecoat to draw the bond, and you to be at nae charge wi' the writings.
  2. The price of grain in the counties of Scotland, as legally fixed on an annual basis.
    • 1817, Committee members, Report respecting the Striking of the Fiars of Grain for the Crop of 1816 for the County of Lanark, The Farmers Magazine, Volume 18, page 310,
      It seems to be a practice as improper as it is unnecessary, to strike the fiars in three different qualities of the same species of grain; and it should, in our humble opinion, be discontinued.
    • 1842, Fife Fiars, from 1619 to 1841 Inclusive, page vi,
      It was answered by the Sheriff. 1st, That the Act of Sederunt did not impose any positive injunction on Sheriffs to strike Fiars; that if the Fiars were substantially just, the Court could have no power to reduce them; and that the Act of Sederunt had never been observed in East Lothian; [] .
    • 1852, George Paterson, Historical Account of the Fiars in Scotland, page 7,
      In further confirmation that this is not the date of the origin, it may be stated, that there is very early mention of Commissaries' Fiars, Sir John Connell tracing the commencement of these so far back as the Reformation, when Commissary or Consistorial Courts were established, in place of those of the bishops or their officials; and notice is taken of the Fiars prices of grain in the records of the Commissary Court so far back as 1564—somewhat earlier than the statute above quoted.

Derived terms[edit]

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for fiar in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913)

Anagrams[edit]


Bavarian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old High German furi. Cognate with German für.

Preposition[edit]

fiar

  1. Form of fia used before a vowel.

Etymology 2[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Numeral[edit]

fiar

  1. four

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin *fidō, from Latin fīdō, fīdere (to trust).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

fiar (first-person singular present fio, past participle fiat)

  1. (transitive) to sell on credit
  2. (reflexive, fiar-se de) to trust
    Synonym: confiar
    Antonym: malfiar-se

Conjugation[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Dalmatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin ferrum. Compare Italian ferro, Romanian and Romansch fier, Friulian fiêr, French fer, Sardinian ferru, Spanish hierro.

Noun[edit]

fiar m

  1. iron

Galician[edit]

Fiando

Etymology 1[edit]

From Late Latin fīlāre, from fīlum (thread). Compare Portuguese fiar, Spanish hilar, Italian filare, French filer.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

fiar (first-person singular present fío, first-person singular preterite fiei, past participle fiado)

  1. to spin (make yarn)
    • 1911, Francisco Portela Pérez, O pé da lareira:
      Fiaba a seña Marica unha boa mazaroca de liño: mollaba nos lábeos os dous pormeiros dedos da man esquerda e tirando cara abaixo faguía un fío daquel manoxo de estrigas, mentras que ca dereita enredábaio no fuso, que bailaba de demoro.
      lady Mary was spinning a large spindleful of flax: she moistened the fist two finger of her left hand on her lips and, pulling down, she was making a thread of that handful of stricks, while with her right hand she was winding it in the spindle, which danced slowly
  2. to string together, put together (words or ideas)
Conjugation[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Vulgar Latin *fidare, from Latin fīdō, fīdere (to trust).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

fiar (first-person singular present fío, first-person singular preterite fiei, past participle fiado)

  1. to guarantee
  2. to sell on credit, give credit
  3. to entrust
  4. to confide
Conjugation[edit]
Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • fiar” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006–2022.
  • fiar” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006–2018.
  • fiar” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006–2013.
  • fiar” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • fiar” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • fiar” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Irish fiar, from Proto-Celtic *wēros (compare Welsh gŵyr), from Proto-Indo-European *weh₁i-ro-s (turned, twisted) (compare English wire), from *weh₁y- (turn, twist) (compare Old Church Slavonic вити (viti), Latin vieō).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fiar m (genitive singular fiair, nominative plural fiara)

  1. slant, tilt, bias, obliquity
  2. bend, twist; crookedness, perverseness

Declension[edit]

Adjective[edit]

fiar

  1. slanting, tilted, oblique, diagonal, crosswise
  2. bent, warped, crooked, perverse

Declension[edit]

Verb[edit]

fiar (present analytic fiarann, future analytic fiarfaidh, verbal noun fiaradh, past participle fiartha)

  1. slant, tilt, veer, turn
  2. bend, twist, distort

Conjugation[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
fiar fhiar bhfiar
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]


Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin ferus (compare French fier).

Adjective[edit]

fiar m

  1. (Guernsey) pleased

Portuguese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

 

  • Hyphenation: fi‧ar

Etymology 1[edit]

From Late Latin fīlāre,[1] from Latin fīlum. Compare Spanish hilar, Italian filare, French filer.

Verb[edit]

fiar (first-person singular present indicative fio, past participle fiado)

  1. to spin (thread)
  2. first-person singular (eu) personal infinitive of fiar
  3. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) personal infinitive of fiar
  4. first-person singular (eu) future subjunctive of fiar
  5. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) future subjunctive of fiar
Conjugation[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Vulgar Latin *fidare, from Latin fidere,[1] present active infinitive of fidō.

Verb[edit]

fiar (first-person singular present indicative fio, past participle fiado)

  1. (Portugal) to trust
    Synonyms: confiar, acreditar
  2. first-person singular (eu) personal infinitive of fiar
  3. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) personal infinitive of fiar
  4. first-person singular (eu) future subjunctive of fiar
  5. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) future subjunctive of fiar
Conjugation[edit]

References[edit]

  1. 1.0 1.1 fiar” in Dicionário infopédia da Língua Portuguesa. Porto: Porto Editora, 2003–2022.

Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Irish fiar, from Proto-Celtic *wēros (compare Welsh gŵyr), from Proto-Indo-European *weh₁i-ro-s (turned, twisted) (compare English wire), from *weh₁-y (turn, twist) (compare Old Church Slavonic вити (viti), Latin vieō).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

fiar (comparative fiara)

  1. bent, crooked
  2. slanting, oblique
  3. squinting (of an eye)
  4. cunning, sly

Verb[edit]

fiar (past dh'fhiar, future fiaraidh, verbal noun fiaradh, past participle fiarte)

  1. bend (become bended)
  2. bend, slant, twist

Mutation[edit]

Scottish Gaelic mutation
Radical Lenition
fiar fhiar
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]

  • Edward Dwelly (1911), “fiar”, in Faclair Gàidhlig gu Beurla le Dealbhan [The Illustrated Gaelic–English Dictionary], 10th edition, Edinburgh: Birlinn Limited, →ISBN
  • G. Toner, M. Ní Mhaonaigh, S. Arbuthnot, D. Wodtko, M.-L. Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “fíar”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Spanish fiar, from Vulgar Latin *fīdāre, from Latin fīdere with a change in conjugation.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈfjaɾ/, [ˈfjaɾ]

Verb[edit]

fiar (first-person singular present fío, first-person singular preterite fie, past participle fiado)

  1. to guarantee
  2. to sell on credit, give credit, put on the slate
  3. to entrust
  4. to confide
  5. (reflexive) (+ de) to trust
    Synonym: confiar

Conjugation[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]