oblique

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French oblique, from Latin oblīquus ‎(slanting, sideways, indirect, envious)

Pronunciation[edit]

In the US Military the 'oblique' command is pronounced 'ob LIKE.'

Adjective[edit]

oblique ‎(comparative obliquer, superlative obliquest)

  1. Not erect or perpendicular; neither parallel to, nor at right angles from, the base; slanting; inclined.
    • Cheyne
      It has a direction oblique to that of the former motion.
  2. Not straightforward; indirect; obscure; hence, disingenuous; underhand; perverse; sinister.
    • Drayton
      The love we bear our friends [] Hath in it certain oblique ends.
    • De Quincey
      This mode of oblique research, when a more direct one is denied, we find to be the only one in our power.
    • Wordsworth
      Then would be closed the restless, oblique eye / That looks for evil, like a treacherous spy.
  3. Not direct in descent; not following the line of father and son; collateral.
    • Baker
      His natural affection in a direct line was strong, in an oblique but weak.
  4. (botany, of leaves) Having the base of the blade asymmetrical, with one side larger or extending further than the other.
  5. (grammar) Pertaining to the oblique case (non-nominative).

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

oblique ‎(plural obliques)

  1. (geometry) An oblique line.
  2. (typography) Alternative term for slash/⟩.
    • 1965, Dmitri A. Borgmann, Language on Vacation, p. 240:
      Initial inquiries among professional typists uncover names like slant, slant line, slash, and slash mark. Examination of typing instruction manuals discloses additional names such as diagonal and diagonal mark, and other sources provide the designation oblique.
    • 1990, John McDermott, Punctuation for Now, p. 20:
      Other Chaucerian manuscripts had the virgule (or virgil or oblique: /) at the middle of lines.
  3. (grammar) The oblique case.

Synonyms[edit]

  • (typography): See slash

Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

oblique ‎(third-person singular simple present obliques, present participle obliquing, simple past and past participle obliqued)

  1. (intransitive) To deviate from a perpendicular line; to move in an oblique direction.
    • Sir Walter Scott
      Projecting his person towards it in a line which obliqued from the bottom of his spine.
  2. (military) To march in a direction oblique to the line of the column or platoon; — formerly accomplished by oblique steps, now by direct steps, the men half-facing either to the right or left.
  3. (transitive, computing) To slant (text, etc.) at an angle.

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin obliquus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

oblique m, f ‎(plural obliques)

  1. oblique

Verb[edit]

oblique

  1. first-person singular present indicative of obliquer
  2. third-person singular present indicative of obliquer
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of obliquer
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of obliquer
  5. second-person singular imperative of obliquer

External links[edit]


Italian[edit]

Adjective[edit]

oblique

  1. feminine plural of obliquo

Latin[edit]

Adjective[edit]

oblīque

  1. vocative masculine singular of oblīquus