via

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See also: viâ and vía

Contents

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈvaɪə/, /ˈviə/

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowing from Latin via ‎(road), of uncertain origin, plausibly cognate with vehere ‎(to conduct).

Noun[edit]

via ‎(plural vias or viae)

  1. A main road or highway, especially in ancient Rome. (Mainly used in set phrases, below.)
  2. (electronics) A small hole in a printed circuit board filled with metal which connects two or more layers.
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowing from Latin viā, ablative singular of via ‎(way, road).

Alternative forms[edit]

Preposition[edit]

via

  1. By way of; passing through.
    They drove from New York to Los Angeles via Omaha.
    You can enter the building via the western gate.
  2. By (means of); using (a medium).
    I'll send you the information via e-mail.
    • 2012 December 1, “An internet of airborne things”, The Economist, volume 405, number 8813, page 3 (Technology Quarterly): 
      A farmer could place an order for a new tractor part by text message and pay for it by mobile money-transfer. A supplier many miles away would then take the part to the local matternet station for airborne dispatch via drone.
  3. As per (a mathematical equation).
    • 2005, Enrico Forestieri (ed.), “Capacity Bounds For MIMO Poisson Channels With Intersymbol Interference, Appendix C”, in Optical Communication Theory and Techniques, ISBN 0387231323, page 44:
      Under the assumptions of Proposition 5 the entropies h(τ) and H(k) are related via the following equation: […]
Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin viā.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

via f ‎(plural vies)

  1. lane
  2. way, path
  3. railway track
  4. channel

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Preposition[edit]

via

  1. via, by way of

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from Latin viā, the ablative of via ‎(road, way), of uncertain origin, plausibly cognate with vehere ‎(to conduct). Entered Dutch in the Latin phrase per via de ‎(by way of), after the Portuguese por via de.

Pronunciation[edit]

Preposition[edit]

via

  1. via, through, by way of
  2. by (means of); using (a medium).

Synonyms[edit]

  • (through (by way of)): langs
  • (by (means of)): per

Derived terms[edit]

  • via via ‎(using various intermediaries)

Esperanto[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Esperanto second-person pronoun vi + possessive ending -a.

Determiner[edit]

via ‎(plural viaj, accusative singular vian, accusative plural viajn)

  1. (possessive) your, yours

See also[edit]


Fijian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Oceanic, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *biʀaq (compare Malay birah), from Proto-Austronesian.

Noun[edit]

via

  1. alocasia

Finnish[edit]

Adverb[edit]

via

  1. via

Anagrams[edit]


Franco-Provençal[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin vīta, from vīvō, vīvere ‎(live), from Proto-Indo-European *gʷeih₃w- ‎(to live).

Noun[edit]

via f

  1. life

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from Latin viā, the ablative of via ‎(road, way), of uncertain origin, plausibly cognate with vehō ‎(convey).

Preposition[edit]

via

  1. via, through, by way of.

External links[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin via.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈvia/, [ˈviː.a]
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: vì‧a

Noun[edit]

via f ‎(plural vie)

  1. road, street, path
  2. way, route
  3. means (to an end)
  4. tract (in the body)
  5. start (of a race)

Synonyms[edit]

  • (street, road, etc.): strada

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Adverb[edit]

via

  1. away
  2. out

Preposition[edit]

via da

  1. away from

Interjection[edit]

via!

  1. come on!
  2. go away!

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Latin Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia la

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Italic *wijā, from Proto-Indo-European *wih₁eh₂-, hence Lithuanian vyti ‎(to pursuit).[1] Or perhaps from Proto-Indo-European *weǵʰ-yā-, a derivation of *weǵʰ- (the source of vehō)[2], hypothesis rejected by De Vaan.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

via f ‎(genitive viae); first declension

  1. road, street or path
  2. way, method, manner
  3. the right way

Inflection[edit]

First declension.

Number Singular Plural
nominative via viae
genitive viae viārum
dative viae viīs
accusative viam viās
ablative viā viīs
vocative via viae

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Michiel de Vaan (2008), Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages, Leiden, Boston: Brill Academic Publishers
  2. ^ Edward A. Roberts, Bárbara Pastor, Diccionario etimológico indoeuropeo de la lengua española, Alianza Editorial 2009, ISBN 978-84-206-5252-8

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

via

  1. simple past of vie
  2. past participle of vie

Portuguese[edit]

Portuguese Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia pt

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Portuguese via, from Latin via ‎(road). See Latin via for details.

Noun[edit]

via f (plural vias)

  1. a way; a path
  2. (rail transport) gauge (distance between the rails of a railway)
  3. medium (means or channel by which an aim is achieved)
  4. an example of a document
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Directly from Latin via ‎(road).

Preposition[edit]

via

  1. via (by way of; passing through)
  2. via (by means of; using a medium)

Noun[edit]

via f (plural vias)

  1. (historical) via (road built by the ancient Romans)

Etymology 3[edit]

Inflected form of ver ‎(to see).

Verb[edit]

via

  1. First-person singular (eu) imperfect indicative of ver
  2. Third-person singular (ele, ela, also used with tu and você?) imperfect indicative of ver

Romanian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From French and Latin via.

Preposition[edit]

via

  1. via, by

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin vīvere, present active infinitive of vīvō, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *gʷeih₃w- ‎(to live).

Verb[edit]

a via (third-person singular present viază, past participle viat1st conj.

  1. (rare) to have life; to live, exist
  2. (of intangibles, such as emotions and beliefs) to endure
Conjugation[edit]
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Form of the adjective viu.

Adjective[edit]

via f

  1. definite feminine singular nominative form of viu
  2. definite feminine singular accusative form of viu

Etymology 4[edit]

Form of the noun vie

Noun[edit]

via

  1. definite singular nominative form of vie. the vineyard
  2. definite singular accusative form of vie. the vineyard

Romansch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • (Sutsilvan, Surmiran) veia

Etymology[edit]

From Latin via.

Noun[edit]

via f (plural vias)

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Puter, Vallader) road, street; way

Synonyms[edit]

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sutsilvan: road, street) strada

Swedish[edit]

Preposition[edit]

via

  1. via, over, by, through