viaticum

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin viāticum (travelling-money, provisions for a journey), from viāticus (of a road or journey), from via (road).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

viaticum (plural viaticums or viatica)

  1. The Eucharist, when given to a person who is dying or one in danger of death.
    • 1971, Keith Thomas, Religion and the Decline of Magic (nonfiction), Folio Society; republished as Religion and the Decline of Magic: Studies in Popular Beliefs in Sixteenth and Seventeenth-Century England, Penguin Books, 2003, →ISBN, page 37:
      [] from Anglo-Saxon times there had been a deep conviction that to receive the viaticum was a virtual death sentence which would make subsequent recovery impossible.
  2. (often figuratively) Provisions, money, or other supplies given to someone setting off on a long journey.
  3. A portable altar.
    (The addition of quotations indicative of this usage is being sought):

Translations[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Substantivization of the neuter form of the adjective viāticus (pertaining to a journey or traveling).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

viāticum n (genitive viāticī); second declension

  1. travelling-money; provision for a journey
  2. (figuratively) a journey
  3. resources; means
  4. money made abroad, especially as a soldier, or used to travel abroad

Declension[edit]

Second-declension noun (neuter).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative viāticum viātica
Genitive viāticī viāticōrum
Dative viāticō viāticīs
Accusative viāticum viātica
Ablative viāticō viāticīs
Vocative viāticum viātica

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