provision

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See also: Provision and provisión

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
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Etymology[edit]

From Middle English provisioun, from Old French provisïon, from Latin prōvīsiō (preparation, foresight), from prōvidēre (provide).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /pɹəˈvɪʒ.ən/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: pro‧vi‧sion

Noun[edit]

provision (countable and uncountable, plural provisions)

  1. An item of goods or supplies, especially food, obtained for future use.
    • 1631, Francis [Bacon], “New Atlantis. A VVorke Vnfinished.”, in Sylua Syluarum: Or A Naturall Historie. In Ten Centuries. [], 3rd edition, London: [] VVilliam Rawley; [p]rinted by J[ohn] H[aviland] for William Lee [], page 17, OCLC 1044372886:
      [H]e hath preſerued all points of Humanity, in taking Order, and making Proviſion for the Releefe of Strangers diſtreſſed; whereof you have taſted.
    • 1674, John Milton, “Book XI”, in Paradise Lost. [], 2nd edition, London: [] S[amuel] Simmons [], OCLC 563123917, page 307:
      [Noah] Began to build a Veſſel of huge bulk, / Meaſur'd by Cubit, length, and breadth, and highth, / Smeared round with Pitch, and in the ſide a dore, / Contriv'd, and of proviſions laid in large / For Man and Beaſt: [...]
    • 1728 [March 17, 1721], Betagh, William, A Voyage Round the World. Being an Account of a Remarkable Enterprize, Begun In the Year 1719, chiefly to cruiſe on the Spaniards in the great South Ocean. Relating the True hiſtorical Facts of that whole Affair: Teſtifyd by many imployd therein; and confirmd by Authorities from the Owners.[1], London: T. Combes, OCLC 433237608, page 151:
      We have an infirm ſhip's company, and but five months proviſion, which muſt ſerve us to China unleſs we get a ſupply at Guam.
  2. The act of providing, or making previous preparation.
  3. Money set aside for a future event.
  4. (accounting) A liability or contra account to recognise likely future adverse events associated with current transactions.
    We increased our provision for bad debts on credit sales going into the recession.
  5. (law) A clause in a legal instrument, a law, etc., providing for a particular matter; stipulation; proviso.
    Synonyms: condition, stipulation
    An arrest shall be made in accordance with the provisions of this Act.
  6. (Roman Catholicism) Regular induction into a benefice, comprehending nomination, collation, and installation.
  7. (Britain, historical) A nomination by the pope to a benefice before it became vacant, depriving the patron of his right of presentation.

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

provision (third-person singular simple present provisions, present participle provisioning, simple past and past participle provisioned)

  1. (transitive) To supply with provisions.
    to provision an army
  2. (transitive, computing) To supply (a user) with an account, resources, etc. so that they can use a system.

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]


Finnish[edit]

Noun[edit]

provision

  1. Genitive singular form of provisio.

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin prōvīsiō (preparation, foresight), from prōvidēre (provide).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

provision f (plural provisions)

  1. provision

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Louisiana Creole French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French provision (provision).

Noun[edit]

provision

  1. provision

Middle English[edit]

Noun[edit]

provision

  1. Alternative form of provisioun