voyage

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: voyagé

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English viage, borrowed from Anglo-Norman viage and Old French voiage, from Latin viaticum. The modern spelling is under the influence of Modern French voyage. Doublet of viaticum.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈvɔɪ.ɪd͡ʒ/
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

voyage (plural voyages)

  1. A long journey, especially by ship.
  2. (archaic) A written account of a journey or travel.
    • 1690, “The Preface to the Reader”, in A Full and True Relation of the Great and Wonderful Revolution That Hapned Lately in the Kingdom of Siam in the East-Indies, London: Randal Taylor, page v:
      I cannot learn what his Name was, unleſs by the Inſcription of the Letters he ſent to the Pope, and to the French King in the Year 1688, mentioned in the ſecond Voyage of Father Tachard []
    • 1690, “A Relation of the Late Great Revolution in Siam, and the Driving Out of the French”, in A Full and True Relation of the Great and Wonderful Revolution That Hapned Lately in the Kingdom of Siam in the East-Indies, London: Randal Taylor, page 1:
      By the various Relations, Embaſſies and Voyages of Siam that have been publiſht within theſe laſt Four Years []
  3. (obsolete) The act or practice of travelling.

Synonyms[edit]

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Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

voyage (third-person singular simple present voyages, present participle voyaging, simple past and past participle voyaged)

  1. (intransitive) To go on a long journey.

Conjugation[edit]

Translations[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French voiage, viage, veiage, from Latin viāticum. Doublet of viatique.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

voyage m (plural voyages)

  1. trip, travel

Verb[edit]

voyage

  1. inflection of voyager:
    1. first/third-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. second-person singular imperative

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]