hallow

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

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From Middle English halwe (a saint, holy thing, shrine), from Old English hālga (a holy one, saint), from Proto-Germanic *hailagô (holy one), from *hailagaz (holy), from Proto-Germanic *hailaz (whole, safe, hale), from Proto-Indo-European *kóylos (safe, unharmed). Cognate with Scots halow, hallow (saint), German Heilige (saint). More at holy, whole.

Noun[edit]

hallow (plural hallows)

  1. (obsolete outside set phrases) A saint; a holy person; an apostle.
    All Hallows Eve (or Halloween), the night before All Hallows Day (now more commonly known as "All Saints Day").
  2. (obsolete, in the plural) The relics or shrines of saints or non-Christian gods.
    To seek hallows: to visit relics or shrines, in the belief that the saints themselves are present there.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English halwen (to hallow, sanctify), from Old English hālgian (to hallow, sanctify, make holy), from Proto-Germanic *hailagōną (to make holy), from *hailagaz (holy), from Proto-Germanic *hailaz (whole, safe, hale), from Proto-Indo-European *kóylos (safe, unharmed). Cognate with Dutch heiligen (to hallow), German heiligen (to hallow). More at holy.

Verb[edit]

hallow (third-person singular simple present hallows, present participle hallowing, simple past and past participle hallowed)

  1. (transitive) To make holy, to sanctify.
    • c 1599, William Shakespeare, s:The Life of Henry the Fifth, Act 1, Scene II
      ...I am coming on, to venge me as I may and to put forth my rightful hand in a well-hallow'd cause.
    • 1847, Charles Swain, Dramatic Chapters: Poems and Songs, D. Bogue, pages 324:
      Come hallow the goblet with something more true / Than words we forget in a minute.
Synonyms[edit]
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Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Middle English halowen, from halow (interjection), from Old English ēalā (O!, alas!, oh!, lo!, interjection), probably conflated with Old French halloer.

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

hallow (third-person singular simple present hallows, present participle hallowing, simple past and past participle hallowed)

  1. To shout, especially to urge on dogs for hunting.

Noun[edit]

hallow (plural hallows)

  1. A shout, cry; a hulloo.
    • 1777, Robin Hood's Chase, reprinted in
      2003, Francis James Child, The English and Scottish Popular Ballads, Courier Dover Publications, →ISBN, page 206:
      Then away they went from merry Sherwood / And into Yorkshire he did hie / And the King did follow, with a hoop and a hallow / But could not come him nigh.
    • 1772, William Read Staples, The Documentary History of the Destruction of the Gaspee, Knowles, Vose, and Anthony, published 1845, pages 14:
      I told them, the sherriff could not be admitted on board this time of night, on which they set up a hallow and rowed as fast as they could towards the vessel's bows.

Etymology 4[edit]

Adjective[edit]

hallow (comparative more hallow, superlative most hallow)

  1. Alternative spelling of hollow
    • 1902, National Council of Geography Teachers (U.S.), The Journal of Geography, National Council for Geographic Education, page 93:
      If the sun were a hallow sphere of its present size and the earth were placed at the center[...]. Such a hallow sphere would hold more than a million balls the size of the earth.
    • 2003, George A. Lyall, To a Different Drummer: A Family's Story, Xlibris Corporation, →ISBN, pages 208:
      But it was not a hallow victory.