Halloween

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See also: halloween and Hallowe'en

English[edit]

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Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

A Scottish shortening of Allhalloweven, from Allhallowmas (the obsolete earlier name of All Saints' Day) + even (an archaic/poetic cognate of eve).

Allhallowmas can be superficially analysed as a combination of all + hallow ("saint, holy person") + -mas ("mass, church festival, holiday" as in Christmas), but it's actually a direct descendant of the Middle English and Old English terms for All Saints' Day, whose parts mean the same as in the modern expression: (Middle English Alhalwemesse) and Old English ealra hālgena mæsse (literally "the mass of all the saints", from eall, halga, and mæsse).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˌha.ləˈwiːn/, /ˌha.ləʊˈiːn/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˌhæ.ləˈwiːn/, /ˌhɑ.ləˈwiːn/, /ˌhæ.loʊˈiːn/
  • (file)

Proper noun[edit]

Halloween (plural Halloweens)

  1. The eve of All Hallows' Day; October 31st; celebrated (mostly in English-speaking countries) by children going door-to-door in costume and soliciting candy with menaces.
    They all get dressed up in scary costumes at Halloween.
    • 1987, Kai Hansen, "Halloween", Helloween, Keeper Of The Seven Keys: Part 1.
      Black is the night full of fright / You'll be missing the day / What will be here very soon / Changing your way / A knock at your door / It is real or is it a dream / On trembling legs you open the door / And you scream... on Halloween

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English Halloween.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

Halloween f (plural Halloweens)

  1. Halloween

See also[edit]


German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Unadapted borrowing from English Halloween.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈhɛloˌwiːn/, /-ˌviːn/
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

Halloween n (strong, genitive Halloweens or Halloween, no plural)

  1. Halloween

Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • Halloween” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache
  • Halloween” in Uni Leipzig: Wortschatz-Lexikon
  • Halloween” in Duden online

Italian[edit]

Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia it

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English Halloween.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

Halloween m

  1. Halloween

See also[edit]


Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Etymology[edit]

Unadapted borrowing from English Halloween.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈxɛ.lɔ.win/, /xɛ.lɔˈwin/, /ˈxa.lɔ.win/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɔwin
  • Syllabification: Ha‧llo‧ween

Proper noun[edit]

Halloween n (indeclinable)

  1. Halloween

Derived terms[edit]

adjective

Further reading[edit]

  • Halloween in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • Halloween in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Unadapted borrowing from English Halloween.

Noun[edit]

Halloween n (uncountable)

  1. Halloween

Declension[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Spanish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia es

Etymology[edit]

Unadapted borrowing from English Halloween.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /xaloˈwin/, [xa.loˈwĩn]
  • IPA(key): /ˈxalowin/, [ˈxa.lo.wĩn]

Noun[edit]

Halloween m (plural Halloweens)

  1. Halloween (31st of October)