commit

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See also: Commit and commît

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin committō (to bring together, join, compare, commit (a wrong), incur, give in charge, etc.), from com- (together) + mittō (to send). See mission.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /kəˈmɪt/
  • Rhymes: -ɪt
  • Hyphenation: com‧mit
  • (file)

Verb[edit]

commit (third-person singular simple present commits, present participle committing, simple past and past participle committed)

  1. (transitive) To give in trust; to put into charge or keeping; to entrust; to consign; used with to or formerly unto.
  2. (transitive) To put in charge of a jailer; to imprison.
  3. (transitive) To have (a person) enter an establishment, such as a hospital or asylum, as a patient.
    Tony should be committed to a nuthouse!
  4. (transitive) To do (something bad); to perpetrate, as a crime, sin, or fault.
    to commit murder
    to commit a series of heinous crimes
  5. (transitive, intransitive) To pledge or bind; to compromise, expose, or endanger by some decisive act or preliminary step. (Traditionally used only reflexively but now also without oneself etc.)[1]
    to commit oneself to a certain action
    to commit to a relationship
    • 8 March, 1769, Junius, letter to the Duke of Grafton
      You might have satisfied every duty of political friendship, without committing the honour of your sovereign.
    • 1803, John Marshall, The Life of George Washington:
      Any sudden assent to the proposal [] might possibly be considered as committing the faith of the United States.
    • 2005 July 31, Teri Karush Rogers, quoting Julie Friedman, “Fear of Committing?”, in The New York Times[1], ISSN 0362-4331:
      [] the perennial bachelor and “the single woman who has never married, who is afraid to commit to an apartment, because she's afraid if she somehow commits to a studio or one-bedroom then she's never going to get married,” said Julie Friedman, a senior associate broker at Bellmarc Realty.
  6. (transitive, computing, databases) To make a set of changes permanent.
    • 2005, Thearon Willis, Beginning Visual Basic 2005 Databases, John Wiley & Sons, →ISBN, page 343:
      When all SQL statements in the transaction are executed successfully, the transaction is committed and all the work that the SQL statements performed is made a permanent part of the database.
    • 2014, Wlodzimierz Gajda, Git Recipes: A Problem-Solution Approach[2], Apress, →ISBN, page 86:
      We can commit all unstaged files with one command: []
  7. (intransitive, obsolete) To enter into a contest; to match; often followed by with[2].
    • 1616, Benjamin Jonson [i.e., Ben Jonson], “Poetaster”, in The Workes of Ben Jonson (First Folio), London: [] Will[iam] Stansby, OCLC 960101342, page 348:
      For, in theſe ſtrifes, and on ſuch perſons, were as wretched to affect a victorie, as it is vnhappy to be committed with them.
    • 1677, Richard Gilpin, “part II, chapter VII”, in Dæmonologia Sacra[3], London: J. D., page 313:
      [] and from hence ( as when Fire and Water are committed together ) ariſeth a most troubleſome conflict.
    • 1877 [4 March 1804], quoting Lord Castlereagh, “part II, chapter VII”, in Sidney James Owen, editor, Selection from the Despatches, Treaties, and Other Papers of the Marquess Wellesley [] [4], Oxford: Clarendon Press, page 263:
      [] whilst it commits us in hostility with the three greatest military powers of the empire.
  8. (transitive, obsolete, Latinism) To confound.
  9. (obsolete, intransitive) To commit an offence; especially, to fornicate.
  10. (obsolete, intransitive) To be committed or perpetrated; to take place; to occur.
    • 1749, Henry Fielding, chapter VIII, in The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling, volume II, London: A[ndrew] Millar [], OCLC 928184292, book IV, page 51:
      As a vaſt Herd of Cows in a rich Farmer's Yard, if, while they are milked, they hear their Calves at a Diſtance, lamenting the Robbery which is then committing, roar and bellow: So roared forth the Somerſetſhire Mob an Hallaloo, made up of almoſt as many Squawls, Screams, and other different Sounds, as there were Perſons, or indeed Paſſions, among them: []

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • German: committen

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

commit (plural commits)

  1. (computing, databases) The act of committing (e.g. a database transaction, or source code into a source control repository), making it a permanent change; such a change.
    • 1988, Klaus R Dittrich, Advances in Object-Oriented Database Systems: 2nd International Workshop:
      To support locking and process synchronization independently of transaction commits, the server provides semaphore objects []
    • 2009, Jon Loeliger, Version Control with Git:
      Every Git commit represents a single, atomic changeset with respect to the previous state.

Descendants[edit]

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/american_speech/v074/74.3shapiro.html
  2. ^ James A. H. Murray [et al.], editors (1884–1928), “Commit, v.”, in A New English Dictionary on Historical Principles (Oxford English Dictionary), volume II (C), London: Clarendon Press, OCLC 15566697, page 684, column 1.

Further reading[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

commit

  1. third-person singular past historic of commettre