bind

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English[edit]

English Wikipedia has articles on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /baɪnd/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -aɪnd

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English binden, from Old English bindan, from Proto-West Germanic *bindan, from Proto-Germanic *bindaną (compare West Frisian bine, Dutch binden, Low German binnen, German binden, Danish binde), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰéndʰ-e-ti, from *bʰendʰ- (to tie)

Compare Welsh benn (cart), Latin offendīx (knot, band), Lithuanian beñdras (partner), Albanian bend (servant, henchman), Ancient Greek πεῖσμα (peîsma, cable, rope), Persian بستن(bastan, to bind), Sanskrit बन्धति (bándhati). Doublet of bandana.

Verb[edit]

bind (third-person singular simple present binds, present participle binding, simple past bound, past participle bound or (archaic, rare) bounden)

  1. (intransitive) To tie; to confine by any ligature.
  2. (intransitive) To cohere or stick together in a mass.
    Just to make the cheese more binding
    • 1707, John Mortimer, The whole Art of Husbandry, in the way of Managing and Improving of Land
      unlocks their [clay's] binding Quality.
  3. (intransitive) To be restrained from motion, or from customary or natural action, as by friction.
    I wish I knew why the sewing machine binds up after I use it for a while.
  4. (intransitive) To exert a binding or restraining influence.
    These are the ties that bind.
  5. (transitive) To tie or fasten tightly together, with a cord, band, ligature, chain, etc.
    to bind grain in bundles  to bind a prisoner
    Synonyms: fetter, make fast, tie, fasten, restrain
  6. (transitive) To confine, restrain, or hold by physical force or influence of any kind.
    Gravity binds the planets to the sun.
    Frost binds the earth.
  7. (transitive) To couple.
  8. (figurative) To oblige, restrain, or hold, by authority, law, duty, promise, vow, affection, or other social tie.
    to bind the conscience  to bind by kindness  bound by affection  commerce binds nations to each other
    Synonyms: restrain, restrict, obligate
  9. (law) To put (a person) under definite legal obligations, especially, under the obligation of a bond or covenant.
  10. (law) To place under legal obligation to serve.
    to bind an apprentice  bound out to service
    Synonym: indenture
  11. (transitive) To protect or strengthen by applying a band or binding, as the edge of a carpet or garment.
  12. (transitive, archaic) To make fast (a thing) about or upon something, as by tying; to encircle with something.
    to bind a belt about one  to bind a compress upon a wound
  13. (transitive) To cover, as with a bandage.
    to bind up a wound
    Synonyms: bandage, dress
  14. (transitive, archaic) To prevent or restrain from customary or natural action, as by producing constipation.
    Certain drugs bind the bowels.
  15. (transitive) To put together in a cover, as of books.
    The three novels were bound together.
  16. (transitive, chemistry) To make two or more elements stick together.
  17. (transitive, programming) To associate an identifier with a value; to associate a variable name, method name, etc. with the content of a storage location.
    • 2008, Bryan O'Sullivan, John Goerzen, Donald Bruce Stewart, Real World Haskell (page 33)
      We bind the variable n to the value 2, and xs to "abcd".
    • 2009, Robert Pickering, Beginning F#, page 123:
      You can bind an identifier to an object of a derived type, as you did earlier when you bound a string to an identifier of type obj []
  18. (Britain, dialect) To complain; to whine about something.
    • 1980, Iris Murdoch, Nuns And Soldiers:
      "But it's not much good piling up the pix if I can't sell them."
      "Oh do stop binding. Think of something. How will we eat, where will we sleep?"

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

bind (plural binds)

  1. That which binds or ties.
  2. A troublesome situation; a problem; a predicament or quandary.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:difficult situation
  3. Any twining or climbing plant or stem, especially a hop vine; a bine.
  4. (music) A ligature or tie for grouping notes.
  5. (chess) A strong grip or stranglehold on a position that is difficult for the opponent to break.
    the Maróczy Bind
  6. The indurated clay of coal mines.

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Albanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Albanian *bind-, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeydʰ- (to persuade, encourage; constrain). Cognate to Ancient Greek πείθω (peíthō, to persuade, convince),[1] Illyrian *Bindus (Illyrian Neptune) and Thracian Bithus (Bithus, theonym).

Verb[edit]

bind (first-person singular past tense binda, participle bindur)

  1. to convince, persuade, amaze
  2. (archaic or chiefly dialectal) to perform magic, cast a spell, wonder, dazzle

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Demiraj, Bardhyl (1997) Albanische Etymologien: Untersuchungen zum albanischen Erbwortschatz [Albanian Etymologies: Investigations into the Albanian Inherited Lexicon] (Leiden Studies in Indo-European; 7)‎[1] (in German), Amsterdam, Atlanta: Rodopi, page 101

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

bind

  1. first-person singular present indicative of binden
  2. imperative of binden

Faroese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From the verb binda.

Noun[edit]

bind n (genitive singular binds, plural bind)

  1. a book binding
  2. a book jacket or cover
  3. a book band
  4. a volume (single book of a publication)
  5. a bandage
  6. armlet, brassard
  7. a sanitary napkin (US) or sanitary towel (UK)
  8. truss

Declension[edit]

Declension of bind
n3 singular plural
indefinite definite indefinite definite
nominative bind bindið bind bindini
accusative bind bindið bind bindini
dative bindi bindinum bindum bindunum
genitive binds bindsins binda bindanna

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From the verb binde

Noun[edit]

bind n (definite singular bindet, indefinite plural bind, definite plural binda or bindene)

  1. a volume (single book of a published work)
  2. a sling (kind of hanging bandage)
    Han går med armen i bind
  3. a sanitary napkin (US) or sanitary towel (UK)
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

bind

  1. imperative of binde

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From the verb binde

Noun[edit]

bind n (definite singular bindet, indefinite plural bind, definite plural binda)

  1. a volume (single book of a publication)
  2. a sling (kind of hanging bandage)
  3. a sanitary napkin (US) or sanitary towel (UK)

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Verb[edit]

bind

  1. imperative of binda.

Wolof[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

bind

  1. to write
    Jàngalekat jaa ngiy bind. - The teacher (here) is writing.