volume

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English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English volume, from Old French volume, from Latin volūmen (book, roll), from volvō (roll, turn about).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈvɒl.juːm/, /ˈvɒl.jʊm/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈvɑl.jum/, /ˈvɑl.jəm/
    • (file)
  • (Wales, Ottawa Valley) IPA(key): /ˈvɒlɪu̯m/
  • Rhymes: -ɒljuːm, -ɒljʊm

Noun[edit]

volume (countable and uncountable, plural volumes)

  1. A three-dimensional measure of space that comprises a length, a width and a height. It is measured in units of cubic centimeters in metric, cubic inches or cubic feet in English measurement.
    The room is 9×12×8, so its volume is 864 cubic feet.
    The proper products can improve your hair's volume.
    • 1997, A. J. Taylor, D. S. Mothram, editors, Flavour Science: Recent Developments[2], Elsevier, →ISBN, page 63:
      Volatiles of kecap manis and its raw materials were extracted using Likens-Nickerson apparatus with diethyl ether as the extraction solvent. The extracts were then dried with anhydrous sodium sulfate, concentrated using a rotary evaporator followed by flushing using nitrogen until the volume was about 0.5 ml.
  2. Strength of sound; loudness.
    Please turn down the volume on the stereo.
    Volume can be measured in decibels.
  3. The issues of a periodical over a period of one year.
    I looked at this week's copy of the magazine. It was volume 23, issue 45.
  4. A bound book.
  5. A single book of a publication issued in multi-book format, such as an encyclopedia.
    The letter "G" was found in volume 4.
  6. (in the plural, by extension) A great amount (of meaning) about something.
  7. (obsolete) A roll or scroll, which was the form of ancient books.
  8. Quantity.
    The volume of ticket sales decreased this week.
  9. A rounded mass or convolution.
  10. (economics) The total supply of money in circulation or, less frequently, total amount of credit extended, within a specified national market or worldwide.
  11. (computing) An accessible storage area with a single file system, typically resident on a single partition of a hard disk.
  12. (bodybuilding) The total of weight worked by a muscle in one training session, the weight of every single repetition summed up.
    (key muscle growth stimuli) Coordinate terms: mechanical tension, frequency

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

See also[edit]

cubic distance
sound

Verb[edit]

volume (third-person singular simple present volumes, present participle voluming, simple past and past participle volumed)

  1. (intransitive) To be conveyed through the air, waft.
    • 1867, George Meredith, chapter 30, in Vittoria[3], volume 2, London: Chapman & Hall, page 258:
      [] thumping guns and pattering musket-shots, the long big boom of surgent hosts, and the muffled voluming and crash of storm-bells, proclaimed that the insurrection was hot.
    • 1885, William Dean Howells, chapter 2, in The Rise of Silas Lapham[4]:
      [] the Colonel, before he sat down, went about shutting the registers, through which a welding heat came voluming up from the furnace.
  2. (transitive) To cause to move through the air, waft.
    • 1872, George Macdonald, chapter 15, in Wilfrid Cumbermede[5], volume I, London: Hurst & Blackett, page 243:
      We lay leaning over the bows, now looking up at the mist blown in never-ending volumed sheets, now at the sail swelling in the wind before which it fled, and again down at the water through which our boat was ploughing its evanescent furrow.
    • 1900, Walter William Skeat, chapter 6, in Malay Magic[6], London: Macmillan, page 420:
      The censer, voluming upwards its ash-gray smoke, was now passed from hand to hand three times round the patient, and finally deposited on the floor at his feet.
    • 1969, Maya Angelou, chapter 33, in I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings[7], New York: Bantam, published 1971, page 219:
      The record player on the first floor volumed up Lonnie Johnson singing, “Tomorrow night, will you remember what you said tonight?”
  3. (intransitive) To swell.

Asturian[edit]

Noun[edit]

volume m (plural volumes)

  1. volume

Dutch[edit]

Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Middle French volume, from Old French volume, from Latin volūmen.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˌvoːˈly.mə/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: vo‧lu‧me

Noun[edit]

volume n (plural volumen or volumes, diminutive volumetje n)

  1. volume (three-dimensional quantity of space)
  2. volume (sound level)
  3. (obsolete) volume, book (single book as an instalment in a series)

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Indonesian: volumê

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin volūmen.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

volume m (plural volumes)

  1. volume (of a book, a written work)
  2. volume (sound)
  3. volume (amount of space something takes up)
  4. volume (amount; quantity)
  5. (figuratively) an overly long piece of writing

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin volūmen (a book, roll).

Noun[edit]

volume m (plural volumes)

  1. volume (quantity of space)
  2. volume (single book of a published work)

Indonesian[edit]

Indonesian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia id

Etymology[edit]

Internationalism, borrowed from Dutch volume, from Middle French volume, from Old French volume, from Latin volūmen.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): (standard) /voˈlumə/, (dialectal) /poˈlumə/
  • Rhymes: -mə,
  • Hyphenation: vo‧lu‧mê

Noun[edit]

volumê (plural volume-volume, first-person possessive volumeku, second-person possessive volumemu, third-person possessive volumenya)

  1. volume:
    1. A three-dimensional measure of space that comprises a length, a width and a height.
    2. loudness: strength of sound.
    3. quantity
      Synonyms: banyaknya, besarnya, bobot
    4. A single book of a publication issued in multi-book format.
      Synonym: jilid
    5. The issues of a periodical over a period of one year.

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Nicoline van der Sijs (2010) Nederlandse woorden wereldwijd[1], Den Haag: Sdu Uitgevers, →ISBN, →OCLC

Further reading[edit]

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin volūmen.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /voˈlu.me/
  • Rhymes: -ume
  • Hyphenation: vo‧lù‧me
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

volume m (plural volumi)

  1. volume (clarification of this definition is needed)

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • volume in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin volūmen (a book, roll).

Noun[edit]

volume m or f

  1. volume, specifically a collection of written works

Descendants[edit]

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Galician-Portuguese volume, borrowed from Latin volūmen.

Pronunciation[edit]

 
 

Noun[edit]

volume m (plural volumes)

  1. (geometry) volume (unit of three-dimensional measure)
  2. volume; loudness (strength of sound)
  3. (publishing) volume (issues of a periodical over a period of one year)
  4. (publishing) volume (individual book of a publication issued as a set of books)
  5. (chiefly historical) volume (bound book)
  6. volume; quantity

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]