binn

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See also: Binn.

English[edit]

Noun[edit]

binn (plural binns)

  1. Archaic spelling of bin (storage container for wine, etc.).
    • 1852 March – 1853 September, Charles Dickens, Bleak House, London: Bradbury and Evans, [], published 1853, →OCLC:
      Mr. Tulkinghorn sits at one of the open windows, enjoying a bottle of old port. Though a hard-grained man, close, dry, and silent, he can enjoy old wine with the best. He has a priceless binn of port in some artful cellar under the Fields, which is one of his many secrets.

Irish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Irish bind, binn (melodious, harmonious; sweet, pleasing),[3] from Proto-Celtic *bandis (harmonious, melodious),[4] probably related to etymology 2 (peak, summit).

Adjective[edit]

binn (genitive singular masculine binn, genitive singular feminine binne, plural binne, comparative binne)

  1. (of music) sweet, melodious, harmonious
Declension[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Irish benn,[5] from Proto-Celtic *bandā (peak, top).

Noun[edit]

binn f (genitive singular binne, nominative plural beanna)

  1. peak, tip, summit (of a mountain or hill)
  2. (architecture) corner, gable
  3. pinnacle
  4. horn
  5. (figuratively) stanza, couplet
Declension[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
binn bhinn mbinn
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Sjoestedt, M. L. (1931) Phonétique d’un parler irlandais de Kerry (in French), Paris: Librairie Ernest Leroux, page 55
  2. ^ Finck, F. N. (1899) Die araner mundart (in German), volume II, Marburg: Elwert’sche Verlagsbuchhandlung, page 44
  3. ^ G. Toner, M. Ní Mhaonaigh, S. Arbuthnot, D. Wodtko, M.-L. Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “binn (‘melodious, harmonious’)”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language
  4. ^ Matasović, Ranko (2009), “*bandi, *bando-”, in Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Celtic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 9), Leiden: Brill, →ISBN, page 54
  5. ^ G. Toner, M. Ní Mhaonaigh, S. Arbuthnot, D. Wodtko, M.-L. Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “benn (‘peak; horn’)”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

Further reading[edit]

Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From a Celtic language, probably Gaulish benna (cart, carriage).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

binn f

  1. stall

Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Irish bind, binn (melodious, harmonious; sweet, pleasing), from Proto-Celtic *bandis (harmonious, melodious), probably related to Irish binn (peak, summit).

Adjective[edit]

binn (comparative binne)

  1. melodious, musical, tuneful, dulcet, sweet
    èist ri òran binn nan eunlisten to the sweet song of the birds
  2. shrill
  3. harmonious

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *bendi, *benni, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeh₂- (to speak), see also Sanskrit भान (bhāna, evidence), English ban (public proclamation, edict).

Noun[edit]

binn f (genitive singular binne, plural binnean)

  1. (law) sentence, judgement, verdict, decision, condemnation
  2. fate
  3. melody
  4. hopper of a mill

Mutation[edit]

Scottish Gaelic mutation
Radical Lenition
binn bhinn
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References[edit]