ben

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English ben, bene, from Old English bēn (prayer, request, favor, compulsory service), from Proto-Germanic *bōniz (supplication), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeh₂- (to say). Related to ban. More at boon.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

ben (plural bens)

  1. (obsolete) A prayer; a petition.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English ben, bene, variation of bin, binne (within), from Old English binnan (within, in, inside of, into), equivalent to be- +‎ in.

Preposition[edit]

ben

  1. (Scotland, Northern England) In, into.
    • 2008, James Kelman, Kieron Smith, Boy, Penguin 2009, page 32:
      And he was waving to me to creep in, so I just did and then just to skip ben the front and then in the lobby.

Adverb[edit]

ben (not comparable)

  1. (Scotland, Northern England) Inside.

Adjective[edit]

ben (comparative benner, superlative benmost)

  1. Inner, interior.
Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

ben (plural bens)

  1. (Scotland, Northern England) Ben-room: The inner room of a two-room hut or shack (as opposed to the but).
Derived terms[edit]
References[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Middle English been, from Old French and Medieval Latin, probably from a North African pronunciation of Arabic بَان(bān, ben tree)

Noun[edit]

ben (plural bens)

  1. A tree, Moringa oleifera or horseradish tree of Arabia and India, which produces oil of ben.
  2. The winged seed of the ben tree.
  3. The oil of the ben seed.
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

From Arabic بِن(bin) and Hebrew בן(ben, son).

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

ben (uncountable)

  1. (usually capitalised) Son of (used with Hebrew and Arabic surnames).
Translations[edit]

Etymology 5[edit]

Borrowed from Scots ben, benn, from Scottish Gaelic beinn

Noun[edit]

ben (plural bens)

  1. A Scottish or Irish mountain or high peak.

Etymology 6[edit]

UK C16. Probably from Latin bene or Italian bene.

Adjective[edit]

ben (comparative benar, superlative benat)

  1. (obsolete, Britain, thieves' cant) Alternative spelling of bene; good.
    • 1611, Middleton, Thomas, The Roaring Girle[2]:
      A gage of ben Rom-bouse, / In a bousing-ken of Rom-vile, / Is benar than a Caster, / Pecke, pennam, lay, or popler, / Which we mill in deuse a vile.
      [paraphrase] A pot of good wine, / In a pub of London, / Is better than a cloak, / Meat, bread, milk, or porridge, / Which we steal in the countryside.

Anagrams[edit]


Amele[edit]

Adjective[edit]

ben

  1. big

Noun[edit]

ben

  1. a big thing

References[edit]

  • Pavol Štekauer, Salvador Valera, Lívia Kőrtvélyessy, Word-Formation in the World's Languages: A Typological Survey (2012)

Berbice Creole Dutch[edit]

Noun[edit]

ben

  1. bean

References[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

ben

  1. Alternative form of

Usage notes[edit]

The form ben is used when it precedes the adjective, adverb or verb form that it modifies, and is used in all other cases.


Cimbrian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German wenne, wanne, from Old High German hwenne, hwanne, from Proto-West Germanic *hwannā, from *hwan, from Proto-Germanic *hwan (when). Cognate with German wenn, wann, English when. Doublet of benn (adverb), from the same Middle High German source.

Conjunction[edit]

ben

  1. (Luserna) when
    Khåntamar khön ben 'z tüata offe di pinakotèk?Can you tell me when the art gallery opens?

References[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse bein (bone, leg), from Proto-Germanic *bainą.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /beːn/, [b̥eːˀn]

Noun[edit]

ben n (singular definite benet, plural indefinite ben)

  1. leg
    Synonym: pusselanke (childish, joking)
  2. bone

Declension[edit]

References[edit]


Domari[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Sauraseni Prakrit 𑀩𑀳𑀺𑀡𑀻 (bahiṇī), from Sanskrit भगिनी (bhaginī). Cognate with Hindi बहन (bahan).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ben f

  1. sister

References[edit]

  • Matras, Yaron (2012) A Grammar of Domari (Mouton Grammar Library)‎[3], Walter de Gruyter, →ISBN, page 65

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɛn
  • IPA(key): /bɛn/

Verb[edit]

ben

  1. first-person singular present indicative of zijn
  2. (dialectal) imperative of zijn

Usage notes[edit]

Ben, as an imperative, is considered non-standard, the standard form being wees.

Synonyms[edit]

References[edit]


Faroese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse ben, from Proto-Germanic *banjō.

Noun[edit]

ben n (genitive singular bens, plural ben)

  1. wound

Declension[edit]

Declension of ben
n3 singular plural
indefinite definite indefinite definite
nominative ben benið ben benini
accusative ben benið ben benini
dative beni beninum benum benunum
genitive bens bensins bena benanna
Declension of ben
n22 singular plural
indefinite definite indefinite definite
nominative ben benið ben benini
accusative ben benið ben benini
dative beni beninum benjum, benum benjunum, benunum
genitive bens bensins benja benjanna

Noun[edit]

ben f (genitive singular benjar, plural benjar)

  1. wound

Declension[edit]

f8 Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative ben benin benjar benjarnar
Accusative ben benina benjar benjarnar
Dative ben benini benjum benjunum
Genitive benjar benjarinnar benja benjanna


Derived terms[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Alternative form of bien

Pronunciation[edit]

Interjection[edit]

ben

  1. Abbreviation of eh bien. Well; uh

Etymology 2[edit]

Clipping of bénard

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ben m (plural bens)

  1. (slang) pants

Further reading[edit]


Friulian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin bene.

Adverb[edit]

ben

  1. well
  2. properly, nicely

Antonyms[edit]

Noun[edit]

ben

  1. good

Related terms[edit]


Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Galician and Old Portuguese ben, from Latin bene.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ben m (plural bens)

  1. benefit; welfare
    Synonym: beneficio
  2. (in the plural) goods
  3. good (the forces that are the enemy of evil)
    Antonym: mal

Related terms[edit]

Adverb[edit]

ben

  1. well
    Ben feito!Well done!
    Antonym: mal
  2. very; a lot; enough
    • 1473, A. López Ferreiro (ed.), Galicia Histórica. Colección diplomática. Santiago: Tipografía Galaica, page 29:
      cando se ganou dos mouros a grande batalla da figeira en donde tamen perdin e me mataron o cabalo e eu sahin ben librado enpero ben ferido de hua saetada enno braço dereito que non a vin curada fasta pasados ben tres meses
      when the great Battle of the Figtree was won to the Moors, where I also lost —and they killed— my horse and I got out safe but badly injured of an arrow shot in the right arm, wound that I saw not cured until more than three moths later
    Eche un rapaz ben espilido!He's a very smart young man!

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • ben” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006-2012.
  • ben” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • ben” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

Interlingua[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Italian bene, French bien, Spanish bien and Portuguese bem.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

ben (comparative melio, superlative le melio)

  1. well

Derived terms[edit]


Istriot[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin bene.

Adverb[edit]

ben

  1. well

Italian[edit]

Adverb[edit]

ben

  1. Apocopic form of bene
    ben fattowell done

Derived terms[edit]


Japanese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

ben

  1. Rōmaji transcription of べん

Kabuverdianu[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Portuguese vir and Spanish venir .

Verb[edit]

ben

  1. to come

Kurdish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ben ?

  1. string, rope

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Ladin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin bene.

Adverb[edit]

ben (comparative miec)

  1. well
  2. properly

Noun[edit]

ben m (plural bens)

  1. (especially in the plural) goods, property

Mandarin[edit]

Romanization[edit]

ben

  1. Nonstandard spelling of bēn.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of běn.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of bèn.

Usage notes[edit]

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Manx[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish ben, from Proto-Celtic *benā, from Proto-Indo-European *gʷḗn.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ben f (genitive singular mreih, plural mraane)

  1. woman

Mutation[edit]

Manx mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
ben ven men
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Verb[edit]

ben

  1. Alternative form of been

References[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse bein, from Proto-Germanic *bainą.

Noun[edit]

ben n (definite singular benet, indefinite plural ben, definite plural bena or benene)

  1. a leg
  2. a bone

Alternative forms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Occitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Occitan ben, from Latin bene.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

ben

  1. well

Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

ben m (plural bens)

  1. good, possession

Old Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *bainą.

Noun[edit]

bēn n

  1. leg
  2. bone

Inflection[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Middle Dutch: bêen
    • Dutch: been
      • Afrikaans: been
    • Limburgish: bein

Further reading[edit]

  • bēn”, in Oudnederlands Woordenboek, 2012

Old English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *bōniz. Cognate with Old Norse bón.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bēn f (nominative plural bēne or bēna)

  1. prayer, praying
  2. request, entreaty
Declension[edit]
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *banjō. Cognate with Old Norse ben.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ben f

  1. Alternative form of benn

Old French[edit]

Adverb[edit]

ben

  1. (Anglo-Norman) Alternative form of bien

Old Irish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *benā, from Proto-Indo-European *gʷḗn.

Noun[edit]

ben f (genitive mná, nominative plural mná)

  1. woman
    Synonyms: banscál, , frac
  2. wife
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 22c10
      Is bés trá dosom aní-siu cosc inna mban i tossug et a tabairt fo chumacte a feir, armbat irlamu de ind ḟir fo chumacte Dǽi, co·mbí íarum coscitir ind ḟir et do·airbertar fo réir Dǽ.
      This, then, is a custom of his, to correct the wives at first and to bring them under the power of their husbands, so that the husbands may be the readier under God’s power, so that afterwards the husbands are corrected and bowed down in subjection to God.
Inflection[edit]
Feminine irregular
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative ben mnaí mná
Vocative ben mnaí mná
Accusative bein, mnaí mnaí mná
Genitive mná ban ban
Dative mnaí mnáib mnáib
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

See the etymology of the main entry.

Verb[edit]

·ben

  1. third-person singular present indicative conjunct of benaid

Verb[edit]

ben

  1. second-person singular imperative of benaid

Mutation[edit]

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
ben ben
pronounced with /v(ʲ)-/
mben
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]


Old Norse[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *banjō.

Noun[edit]

ben f (genitive benjar, plural benjar)

  1. mortal wound
  2. small bleeding wound

ben n

  1. wound

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]

  • bani m (bane)
  • benja (to wound mortally)

References[edit]

  • ben in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press

Old Occitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin bene.

Adjective[edit]

ben

  1. well

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]


Old Saxon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *bainą. Cognate with Old Frisian bēn (West Frisian bien), Old English bān (English bone), Dutch been (bone, leg), Old High German bein (German Bein (leg)), Old Norse bein (Icelandic bein (bone)).

Noun[edit]

bēn n

  1. bone

Descendants[edit]


Old Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse bein, from Proto-Germanic *bainą.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bēn n

  1. bone
  2. leg

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Scots[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English binnan.

Noun[edit]

ben (plural bens)

  1. The inner room of a two-room hut or shack (as opposed to the but).

Adjective[edit]

ben (comparative benner, superlative benmaist)

  1. Inner, interior.

Preposition[edit]

ben

  1. Through, in, into (a dwelling).
    A gaed ben the chaumer.

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from Scottish Gaelic beinn.

Noun[edit]

ben (plural bens)

  1. mountain, hill

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Ottoman Turkish بڭ(beñ), ultimately from Proto-Turkic *beŋ (mole on the face).

Noun[edit]

ben m (Cyrillic spelling бен)

  1. (regional) birthmark
  2. (regional) mole
  3. (regional) naevus

Synonyms[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Swedish bēn, from Old Norse bein, from Proto-Germanic *bainą.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ben n

  1. (anatomy) leg; a body part
  2. leg; part of trousers which covers the legs
  3. the part of a piece furniture on which it stands
  4. (anatomy) bone; any of the components of an endoskeleton
  5. (anatomy) bone; the material of the endoskeleton

Declension[edit]

Declension of ben 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative ben benet ben benen
Genitive bens benets bens benens

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]


Turkish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /bɛn/, /bæn/
  • Hyphenation: ben

Etymology 1[edit]

From Ottoman Turkish بن(ben, I), from Proto-Turkic *ben (I).

Cognate with Old Turkic 𐰢𐰤(men), 𐰋𐰤(ben, I), Karakhanid مَنْ(men, I), Azerbaijani mən, Bashkir мин (min), Chuvash эпӗ (epĕ), Kazakh мен (men), Kyrgyz мен (men), Turkmen men.

Possibly related to Mongolian би (bi, I), Manchu ᠪᡳ (bi, I).[1]

Pronoun[edit]

ben

  1. I
Usage notes[edit]
  • It is one of the two words that have irregular dative case declension. (The other word is "sen").
  • It is one of the two words that have irregular genitive case declension. (The other word is "biz").
Declension[edit]
See also[edit]

Noun[edit]

ben (definite accusative beni, plural biz)

  1. (psychology) ego
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Ottoman Turkish بڭ(beŋ, mole), from Proto-Turkic *beŋ (mole on the face).[2]

Cognate with Bashkir миң (miñ), Kyrgyz мең (meñ), Kazakh мең (meñ) Turkmen meň, Yakut мэҥ (meŋ). Also compare Mongolian мэнгэ (menge, mole, birthmark).

Noun[edit]

ben (definite accusative beni, plural benler)

  1. birthmark, mole
Declension[edit]
Inflection
Nominative ben
Definite accusative beni
Singular Plural
Nominative ben benler
Definite accusative beni benleri
Dative bene benlere
Locative bende benlerde
Ablative benden benlerden
Genitive benin benlerin
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Janhunen, Juha (2013), “Personal pronouns in Core Altaic”, in Shared Grammaticalization: With Special Focus on the Transeurasian Languages[1], page 221
  2. ^ Starostin, Sergei; Dybo, Anna; Mudrak, Oleg (2003), “*beŋ”, in Etymological dictionary of the Altaic languages (Handbuch der Orientalistik; VIII.8), Leiden, New York, Köln: E.J. Brill

Venetian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin bene.

Adverb[edit]

ben

  1. well

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Volapük[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin bene.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ben (nominative plural bens)

  1. (sense of) well-being, welfare, being well, wellness

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Welsh[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ben

  1. Soft mutation of pen.

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
pen ben mhen phen
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.