welcome

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English[edit]

A not very welcome message on a doormat

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English welcome, wolcume, wulcume, wilcume, from Old English wilcuma ("one whose coming is pleasant, a welcome person or thing, a guest"; compare also wilcume ‎(welcome!, interjection)), from Proto-Germanic *weljakwumô ‎(a comer, a welcomed guest), equivalent to will ‎(desire) +‎ come ‎(comer, arrival). Cognate with Scots walcome ‎(welcome), West Frisian wolkom ‎(welcome), Dutch welkom ‎(welcome), German willkommen ‎(welcome), Danish and Norwegian velkommen ‎(welcome), Swedish välkommen ‎(welcome), Icelandic velkomin ‎(welcome).

Similar constructions are common in Romance languages, such as Italian benvenuto, Spanish bienvenido, French bienvenue and Portuguese bem-vindo, each meaning “[may you have fared] well [in] coming [here]”. These do not derive from Classic Latin, where a similar construction is not found, and presumably are instead the result of a calque from Germanic to Proto-Romance (Vulgar Latin).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈwɛl.kəm/, /wɛʟ.kəm/
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Adjective[edit]

welcome ‎(comparative more welcome, superlative most welcome)

  1. Whose arrival is a cause of joy; received with gladness; admitted willingly to the house, entertainment, or company.
    a welcome visitor
    • William Cowper (1731-1800)
      When the glad soul is made Heaven's welcome guest.
  2. Producing gladness.
    a welcome present;  welcome news
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 7, The Mirror and the Lamp:
      “A very welcome, kind, useful present, that means to the parish. By the way, Hopkins, let this go no further. We don't want the tale running round that a rich person has arrived. Churchill, my dear fellow, we have such greedy sharks, and wolves in lamb's clothing.  []
  3. Free to have or enjoy gratuitously.
    You are welcome to the use of my library.
    • 1915, George A. Birmingham, Gossamer, chapterI:
      As a political system democracy seems to me extraordinarily foolish, but I would not go out of my way to protest against it. My servant is, so far as I am concerned, welcome to as many votes as he can get. I would very gladly make mine over to him if I could.

Translations[edit]

Interjection[edit]

welcome

  1. Greeting given upon someone's arrival.

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Noun[edit]

welcome ‎(plural welcomes)

  1. The act of greeting someone’s arrival, especially by saying "Welcome!"; reception.
  2. The utterance of such a greeting.
  3. Kind reception of a guest or newcomer.
    We entered the house and found a ready welcome.
    • Shenstone
      his warmest welcome at an inn
    • South
      Truth finds an entrance and a welcome too.

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Verb[edit]

welcome ‎(third-person singular simple present welcomes, present participle welcoming, simple past and past participle welcomed)

  1. To affirm or greet the arrival of someone, especially by saying "Welcome!".
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 5, The Celebrity:
      But Miss Thorn relieved the situation by laughing aloud, [] . By the time we reached the house we were thanking our stars she had come. Mrs. Cooke came out from under the port-cochere to welcome her.
  2. To accept something willingly or gladly.
    We welcome suggestions for improvement.

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