wel

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Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch wel, from Old Dutch *wela, wala, from Proto-Germanic *wela, from Proto-Indo-European *welh₁-. Compare German wohl, English well, Danish and Norwegian vel.

Adverb[edit]

wel

  1. The opposite of not (used to add positive emphasis to the verb, much like the auxiliaries "do" or "does" in affirmative sentences in English)
    Ik dacht dat je niet van golf hield? — Ik hou wel van golf!
    I thought you didn't like golf? — I do like golf!
    Je ziet wel dat...
    You [can] certainly see that...
    I ken hem wel, maar niet goed.
    I do know him, but not well.
  2. no less than, as much as, as many as (expressing amazement)
    Zij heeft wel twaalf uur gewerkt vandaag!
    She has worked no less than twelve hours today!
  3. fairly
    Ik voel me wel aardig, maar niet echt goed.
    I feel fairly decent, but not really good.
  4. (dated, regional) well
    Wat God doet, dat is wel gedaan.
    What God does, that is well done.
    "Dat is wel gedacht," zeide hij.
    "That is well thought through, " he said.

Usage notes[edit]

  • In sense 1, the word is often strongly stressed and therefore written with an accent: wél.
  • Using wel as adverbial form of goed is rare. Usually, the adjective is used in its bare form (as with other adjectives).

Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

wel

  1. first-person singular present indicative of wellen
  2. imperative of wellen

Middle Dutch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Dutch *wela, wala, from Proto-Germanic *wela.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

wel (comparative bat or beter, superlative best)

  1. well

Descendants[edit]


North Frisian[edit]

Verb[edit]

wel

  1. (Föhr-Amrum Dialect) to want
  2. (Föhr-Amrum Dialect) shall, will (future tense auxiliary verb)

Conjugation[edit]


Usage notes[edit]

  • wel, wal, wääl, wul, and wulen were previously written as well, wall, wäl, wull and wullen respectively.

Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *wela, from Proto-Indo-European *welh₁-. Akin to Old Frisian wela, Old Saxon wela, Old High German wola, Old Norse vel, Gothic 𐍅𐌰𐌹𐌻𐌰 ‎(waila).

Adverb[edit]

wel (comparative bet, superlative best)

  1. well

Descendants[edit]


Welsh[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from English well.

Pronunciation[edit]

Interjection[edit]

wel

  1. well