wel

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search
See also: we'l and wel-

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Dutch wel, from Old Dutch *wela, wala, from Proto-Germanic *wela, from Proto-Indo-European *welh₁-. Compare German wohl, English well, Icelandic vel, Swedish väl, Danish and Norwegian vel.

Adverb[edit]

wel

  1. The opposite of not (used to add positive emphasis to the verb, much like the auxiliaries "do" or "does" in affirmative sentences in English)
    Ik dacht dat je niet van golf hield? — Ik hou wél van golf!
    I thought you didn't like golf? — I do like golf!
    Je ziet wel dat...
    You [can] certainly see that...
    I ken hem wel, maar niet goed.
    I do know him, but not well.
    Maar wat wil je dan wel?
    But then what do you want?
  2. no less than, as much as, as many as (expressing amazement)
    Zij heeft wel twaalf uur gewerkt vandaag!
    She has worked no less than twelve hours today!
  3. fairly
    Ik voel me wel aardig, maar niet echt goed.
    I feel fairly decent, but not really good.
  4. (dated, regional) well
    Wat God doet, dat is wel gedaan.
    What God does, that is well done.
    "Dat is wel gedacht," zeide hij.
    "That is well thought through, " he said.
Usage notes[edit]
  • In sense 1, the word is often strongly stressed (especially when directly contradicting a negative statement or question) and therefore written with an accent: wél.
  • Using wel as adverbial form of goed is rare. Usually, the adjective is used in its bare form (as with other adjectives).
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From the adverb wel.

Noun[edit]

wel n (uncountable)

  1. weal (general state of well-being and prosperity)

Etymology 3[edit]

From Middle Dutch *welle, from Old Dutch *wella, from Proto-Germanic *wallijō.

Noun[edit]

wel f (plural wellen, diminutive welletje n)

  1. (rare) well, source

Etymology 4[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

Noun[edit]

wel c (plural wellen, diminutive welletje n)

  1. well; shaft (excavation made for the extraction of mineral resources)

Etymology 5[edit]

Non-lemma forms.

Verb[edit]

wel

  1. first-person singular present indicative of wellen
  2. imperative of wellen

Middle Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Dutch *wela, wala, from Proto-Germanic *wela.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

wel (comparative bat or beter, superlative best)

  1. well

Alternative forms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • wel (III), wale”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • wel (I)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, 1929

North Frisian[edit]

Verb[edit]

wel

  1. (Föhr-Amrum Dialect) to want
  2. (Föhr-Amrum Dialect) shall, will (future tense auxiliary verb)

Conjugation[edit]


Usage notes[edit]

  • wel, wal, wääl, wul, and wulen were previously written as well, wall, wäl, wull and wullen respectively.

Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *wela, from Proto-Indo-European *welh₁-. Akin to Old Frisian wela, Old Saxon wela, Old High German wola, Old Norse vel, Gothic 𐍅𐌰𐌹𐌻𐌰 (waila).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

wel (comparative bet, superlative best)

  1. well

Descendants[edit]


Tok Pisin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English oil.

Noun[edit]

wel

  1. oil

Adjective[edit]

wel

  1. slippery
  2. tricky; cunning
  3. inedible
  4. feral

Welsh[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English well.

Pronunciation[edit]

Interjection[edit]

wel

  1. well

Westrobothnian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse væla.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

wel

  1. to cry, to wail