wal

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Translingual[edit]

Symbol[edit]

wal

  1. (international standards) ISO 639-2 & ISO 639-3 language code for Wolaitta.

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ʋɑl/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: wal
  • Rhymes: -ɑl

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin vallum (wall), from vallus (stake, palisade, point). Cognate with English wall.

Noun[edit]

wal m (plural wallen, diminutive walletje n)

  1. coast, shore (side of land near to the water)
  2. earthen levee as protection against flooding
    Synonym: dijk
  3. wall around city as military defense
    Synonyms: omwalling, stadsmuur
  4. periorbital dark circle
  5. (generally in the plural) eyebags
    Synonym: oogwal
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Negerhollands: wal

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle Dutch wal (whale), from Old Dutch *wal, from Proto-West Germanic *hwal, from Proto-Germanic *hwalaz (whale). Cognate with English whale.

Possibly to avoid confusion with wal (wall; shore), the derived compound word walvis (whale; lit. whale-fish) gained currency over wal (whale). Similar clarifying compounds can be found elsewhere in Dutch: kraanvogel (crane; lit. crane-bird), muildier (mule; lit. mule-animal), oeros (auroch; auroch-ox), rendier (rein; lit. rein-animal), tortelduif (turtle (bird); lit. turtle dove) and windhond (greyhound; lit. wind-dog).

Noun[edit]

wal m (plural wallen, diminutive walletje n)

  1. (archaic) whale
    Synonyms: walvis, waldier
Derived terms[edit]

Eskayan[edit]

Numeral[edit]

wal

  1. eight

Gamilaraay[edit]

wal

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

wal

  1. container
  2. rubbish bin

References[edit]

  • (2017) Giacon J Gamilaraay-Yuwaalaraay Dictionary Supplement

Garo[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun[edit]

wal

  1. night

Hausa[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Ideophone[edit]

wàl

  1. sudden flash of light

Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English weall, from Proto-West Germanic *wall (wall, rampart, entrenchment), from Latin vallum (wall, rampart, entrenchment, palisade).

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

wal (plural walles)

  1. wall
Descendants[edit]
References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old English wæl.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

wal (plural wals)

  1. death, slaughter
References[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Noun[edit]

wal

  1. Alternative form of wale (selection, preference)

Adjective[edit]

wal

  1. Alternative form of wale (great)

Etymology 4[edit]

Adverb[edit]

wal

  1. (rare) Alternative form of wel

Old High German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *hwal, from Proto-Germanic *hwalaz, from Proto-Indo-European *(s)kʷálos (sheatfish). Cognate with Old English hwæl, Old Norse hvalr, Old Saxon hwal.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

wal m

  1. whale

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Middle High German: wal
    • German: Wal
      • Estonian: vaal
      • Luxembourgish: Wal

Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from German Wal, from Old High German wal, from Proto-West Germanic *hwal, from Proto-Germanic *hwalaz, from Proto-Indo-European *(s)kʷálos (sheatfish).

Noun[edit]

wal m anim

  1. whale (certain species)
Declension[edit]
Hypernyms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb[edit]

wal

  1. second-person singular imperative of walić

Further reading[edit]

  • wal in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • wal in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Welsh[edit]

wal

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Old English weall.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

wal m (plural waliau or welydd)

  1. wall
  2. (literary) Soft mutation of gwal.

Usage notes[edit]

wal is the most commonly used word for "wall" in Welsh. The word mur is used most often when referring to large walls such as the defensive walls of a city or Mur Mawr Tsieina "The Great Wall of China". It is also used in compound words, for example murlun, rhagfur, cellfur, briwydd y mur. pared in an internal partition wall whereas magwyr is a literary word for an external wall, little used now but preserved in such things as place and plant names.

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
gwal wal ngwal unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References[edit]

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), “wal”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies