walrus

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English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
A walrus

Etymology[edit]

Probably borrowed from Dutch walrus, a compound of wal (whale) and ros (horse). Displaced native Old English horshwæl (literally horse whale). Compare similar constructions in Danish hvalros, Old Norse hrosshvalr, and German Walross.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈwɔːl.ɹəs/, /ˈwɒl.ɹəs/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈwɑl.ɹəs/, /ˈwɔl.ɹəs/
  • (file)
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

walrus (plural walruses or walrus or walrusses or (both nonstandard, proscribed, uncommon) walri or walrii)

  1. A large Arctic marine mammal related to seals and having long tusks, tough, wrinkled skin, and four flippers, Odobenus rosmarus.
    • 1887, James W. Buel, Sea and Land, page 251:
      Of all the Phocine family none present so terrible and grotesque an appearance as the gigantic Walrus, also known as the morse and sea-horse.
  2. (informal, sometimes derogatory) A man with a walrus moustache.
    • 2008, James E. Martin, The Chartreuse Mongoose (page 145)
      You old walrus, don't you think it is time for you to lop your whiskers off?
    • 2013, Marione Ingram, The Hands of War
      One, a rumpled, whiskered walrus of a man, held a lantern near Mother's face.

Quotations[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Verb[edit]

walrus (third-person singular simple present walruses or walrusses, present participle walrusing or walrussing, simple past and past participle walrused or walrussed)

  1. To hunt walruses
    • 2016, Andrey Kurkov, The President's Last Love, Kiev, 9 May 1985:
      It's strange to see parties of merrymakers gather where I nearly drowned, and later walrused with David Isaakovich, Father Basil and the rest of them.
  2. To be like a walrus
    1. To move dragging one's belly along the floor
      • 2020, Will Ferguson, The Finder: A Novel:
        Gaddy walrused herself from the back seat
    2. To hang like a walrus's moustache
      • 2000, Michael L. McCoy, The Hunter, the Hound and a Rogue:
        His untrimmed mustache walrused down and over his hidden mouth
    3. To be prominent, like tusks
      • 2011, Robert Buettner, Overkill:
        Where a mammal had its canine teeth, great fangs walrused down from the grezzen's upper jaw, as long as scimitars and as thick as human thighs.

Afrikaans[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch walrus, probably from Danish hvalros or Swedish valross, from an inversion of Old Norse hrosshvalr (horse-whale).

Noun[edit]

walrus (plural walrusse)

  1. walrus (Odobenus rosmarus)

Cebuano[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English walrus, from Danish hvalros, an inversion of Old Norse hrosshvalr (literally horse-whale). The term may have entered English via Dutch walrus.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Hyphenation: wal‧rus

Noun[edit]

walrus

  1. a walrus (Odobenus rosmarus)

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

The origin of this word is not wholly certain, with several theories proposed. Probably borrowed from Danish hvalros or Swedish valross, from an inversion of Old Norse hrosshvalr (horse-whale). Equivalent to wal (whale; large sea-animal) +‎ ros (horse). The Old Norse word may, however, been a folk-etymological modification of Old Norse rossmal, related to Proto-Germanic *rusta-, from the rust colour of the animal.[1] Preference for borrowing the inverted form could have been due to the influence of the already existing Dutch compound walvis (whale, literally whale-fish).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈʋɑlrʏs/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: wal‧rus

Noun[edit]

walrus m (plural walrussen, diminutive walrusje n)

  1. walrus, any member of the family Odobenidae of which Odobenus rosmarus is the sole extant member

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Afrikaans: walrus

References[edit]

  1. ^ Philippa, Marlies; Debrabandere, Frans; Quak, Arend; Schoonheim, Tanneke; van der Sijs, Nicoline (2003–2009) Etymologisch woordenboek van het Nederlands (in Dutch), Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press