morse

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: Morse and morsë

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle French mors, from Latin morsus (bite; clasp), from mordere (to bite).

Noun[edit]

morse (plural morses)

  1. A clasp or fastening used to fasten a cope in the front, usually decorative. [from 15th c.]
    • 1890, Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. XI:
      The morse bore a seraph's head in gold-thread raised work.

Etymology 2[edit]

Origin uncertain. Compare Russian морж (morž, walrus), Sami morša, Finnish mursu (all attested later).

Noun[edit]

morse (plural morses)

  1. (now rare) A walrus. [from 15th c.]
    • 1880-1881: Clements R Markham (editor), The Voyages of William Baffin, 1612-1622:
      Then we passed through a great deale of small ice, and sawe, upon some peices, two morses, and upon some, one; and also diuers seales, layeing upon peices of ice.

Anagrams[edit]


Breton[edit]

Adverb[edit]

morse

  1. never

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Verb[edit]

morse

  1. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of morsen

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Russian морж (morž), from Northern Sami.

Noun[edit]

morse m (plural morses)

  1. walrus
See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

morse m (uncountable)

  1. Morse code

Anagrams[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Italian[edit]

Noun[edit]

morse f

  1. plural of morsa

Verb[edit]

morse

  1. third-person singular past historic of mordere

morse f

  1. plural of morso

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Participle[edit]

morse

  1. vocative masculine singular of morsus

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English Morse, after the American inventor Samuel Morse.

Noun[edit]

morse m (definite singular morsen) (uncountable)

  1. Morse or Morse code

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

morse (imperative mors, present tense morser, simple past and past participle morsa or morset)

  1. (sende morse) to transmit Morse code
  2. to die

Usage notes[edit]

Using morse to signify die instead of the more common is a special usage found among health workers. The use of the term in this way is unknown in the general population.

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English Morse, named after Samuel Morse (1791–1872).

Noun[edit]

morse m (definite singular morsen, uncountable)

  1. Morse code

Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

morse (present tense morsar, past tense morsa, past participle morsa, passive infinitive morsast, present participle morsande, imperative mors)

  1. to transmit Morse code

References[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Swedish morghons. From morgon + -s (adverbial suffix). Compare the development of afse (from afton).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

morse

  1. adverbial genitive form of morgon; a past morning

Usage notes[edit]

  • Only found in the expression i morse (the morning of today), and related expressions, e.g. i går morse (”yesterday morning”), i måndags morse (”last Monday morning”).

See also[edit]