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Perfect passive participle of mordeō (I bite).



morsus m (feminine morsa, neuter morsum); first/second declension

  1. bitten, eaten, devoured, consumed, having been bitten
  2. (figuratively) stung, pained, hurt, bitten, having been stung


First/second declension.

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masculine Feminine Neuter Masculine Feminine Neuter
nominative morsus morsa morsum morsī morsae morsa
genitive morsī morsae morsī morsōrum morsārum morsōrum
dative morsō morsō morsīs
accusative morsum morsam morsum morsōs morsās morsa
ablative morsō morsā morsō morsīs
vocative morse morsa morsum morsī morsae morsa


morsus m (genitive morsūs); fourth declension

  1. a bite, sting
  2. (by extension) sharpness of flavor, sharp taste, pungency
  3. (figuratively) pain, vexation, bite, sting
  4. vocative singular of morsus


  1. nominative plural of morsus
  2. genitive singular of morsus
  3. accusative plural of morsus
  4. vocative plural of morsus


Fourth declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative morsus morsūs
genitive morsūs morsuum
dative morsuī morsibus
accusative morsum morsūs
ablative morsū morsibus
vocative morsus morsūs

Derived terms[edit]



  • morsus in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • morsus in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • du Cange, Charles (1883), “morsus”, in G. A. Louis Henschel, Pierre Carpentier, Léopold Favre, editors, Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (in Latin), Niort: L. Favre
  • morsus in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français [Illustrated Latin-French Dictionary], Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • the pain is very severe: acer morsus doloris est (Tusc. 2. 22. 53)