hurt

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English[edit]

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Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English hurten, hirten, hertan ‎(to injure, scathe, knock together), from Old Northern French hurter ("to ram into, strike, collide with"; > Modern French heurter), perhaps from Frankish *hūrt ‎(a battering ram), from Proto-Germanic *hrūtaną, *hreutaną ‎(to fall, beat), from Proto-Indo-European *krew- ‎(to fall, beat, smash, strike, break). Related to Dutch horten ‎(to push against, strike), Middle Low German hurten ‎(to run at, collide with), Old Norse hrútr ‎(battering ram).

Alternate etymology traces Old Northern French hurter rather to Old Norse hrútr ‎(ram (male sheep)), lengthened-grade variant of hjǫrtr ‎(stag),[1] from Proto-Germanic *herutuz, *herutaz ‎(hart, male deer), which would relate it to English hart ‎(male deer). See hart.

Verb[edit]

hurt ‎(third-person singular simple present hurts, present participle hurting, simple past and past participle hurt)

  1. (intransitive) To be painful.
    Does your leg still hurt? / It is starting to feel better.
  2. (transitive) To cause (a creature) physical pain and/or injury.
    If anybody hurts my little brother I will get upset.
  3. (transitive) To cause (somebody) emotional pain.
  4. (transitive) To undermine, impede, or damage.
    This latest gaffe hurts the MP's reelection prospects still further.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Translations[edit]

Adjective[edit]

hurt ‎(comparative more hurt, superlative most hurt)

  1. Wounded, physically injured.
  2. Pained.

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Noun[edit]

hurt ‎(plural hurts)

  1. An emotional or psychological hurt (humiliation or bad experience)
    • How to overcome old hurts of the past
  2. (archaic) A bodily injury causing pain; a wound or bruise.
    • 1605, Shakespeare, King Lear vii
      I have received a hurt.
    • John Locke
      The pains of sickness and hurts [] all men feel.
  3. (archaic) injury; damage; detriment; harm
    • Shakespeare
      Thou dost me yet but little hurt.
  4. (heraldry) A roundel azure (blue circular spot).
  5. (engineering) A band on a trip-hammer helve, bearing the trunnions.
  6. A husk.

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ D.Q. Adams, Encyclopeida of Indo-European Culture, s.v. "horn" (London: Fitzroy-Dearborn, 1999), 273.

Anagrams[edit]


Polish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German

Noun[edit]

hurt m inan

  1. wholesale

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]