mancar

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Asturian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Verb[edit]

mancar

  1. to pierce
  2. to hurt, injure

Conjugation[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From manc (one-handed) or from Italian mancare.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

mancar (first-person singular present manco, past participle mancat)

  1. (intransitive) (followed by preposition de) to be lacking
  2. (intransitive) (followed by preposition a) to be false to, to fail, to go back on
  3. (intransitive) to be missing, to be absent
  4. (transitive) to miss, to fail

Conjugation[edit]


Galician[edit]

Verb[edit]

mancar (first-person singular present manco, first-person singular preterite manquei, past participle mancado)

  1. to pierce
  2. to hurt, injure

Conjugation[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From manco (lame) +‎ -ar.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

mancar (first-person singular present indicative manco, past participle mancado)

  1. (intransitive) to limp (to walk lamely, as if favouring one leg)
    Synonym: coxear
  2. (rare, transitive) to lame (to cause someone to be lame)
    Synonym: deixar manco
  3. (Brazil, slang, takes a reflexive pronoun) to make oneself scarce; to leave
    Synonyms: vazar, sumir
  4. (dated slang, intransitive) to miss (to fail to attent)
    Synonym: faltar

Conjugation[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • mancar” in Dicionário Priberam da Língua Portuguesa.

Spanish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /manˈkaɾ/, [mãŋˈkaɾ]

Verb[edit]

mancar

  1. to injure; maim

Conjugation[edit]

  • c becomes qu before e.

Venetian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin mancus (maimed, powerless) (compare Italian mancare).

Verb[edit]

mancar

  1. (transitive, but normally impersonal) to lack; to be lacking or missing

Conjugation[edit]

  • Venetian conjugation varies from one region to another. Hence, the following conjugation should be considered as typical, not as exhaustive.