manqué

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See also: manque

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Existing in English from the eighteenth century[1]: from French manqué, past participle form of manquer (to lack, to be lacking in).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

manqué (not comparable)

  1. (postpositive)[1] Unfulfilled due to the vagary of circumstance, some inherent flaw or an — often uncertain — constitutional lacking of some kind.
    • 1975, D. Hockney, W. Harper, B. Freed, Contemporary Research in Philosophical Logic and Linguistic Semantics, Springer, ISBN 9027705127, page 78:
      The four possible combinations of values can be named Truth and Falsity (with capital initials) and truth-manqué and falsity-manqué (with lower-case initials).
    • 1988, Bernard Schwartz, The Unpublished Opinions of the Burger Court, Oxford University Press, ISBN 0195053176, page 83:
      Roe v. Wade (1973): How a Legal Landmark Manqué Became a Constitutional Cause Célèbre
    • 1992, Irene Masing-Delic, Abolishing Death, A Salvation Myth of Russian Twentieth-Century Literature, Stanford University Press, ISBN 0804719357, page 78:
      Perhaps there was a feeling of moral triumph over a celebrated man, who was a noble man manqué because of his character flaws, whereas Fyodorov was a nobleman manqué for purely biological and social reasons, his illegitimacy.
    • 1994, C. Fred. Alford, Group Psychology and Political Theory, Yale University Press, ISBN 0300059582, page 156:
      Over the course of several hundred years, the individual spread throughout Europe. So too, says Oakeshott, did the individual manqué, one who feared his freedom and sought to return to the comfort and order of communal life.
    • 1997, Harm Jan Habing and Henny J. G. L. M. Lamers (editors), Planetary Nebulae, Symposium No. 180, International Astronomical Union, Kluwer Academic Publishers, ISBN 0792348923, page 441:
      The H-HB and AGB-manqué stars of high metallicity (say Z>0.07) which are expected to be present albeit in small percentages in the stellar content of bulges and elliptical galaxies in general.
    • 1997, Isaac Levi, The Covenant of Reason, Rationality and the Commitments of Thought, Cambridge University Press, ISBN 0521576016, page 65:
      [] even with this charitable construal, the logic of consistency specifying what a rational agent ought to fully believe to be ideally consistent remains S5 and, hence, different from the S5-manqué logic of truth. [] Weakening the logic of consistency to S5-manqué while keeping the S5-manqué logic of truth intact is not workable.

Usage notes[edit]

  • This adjective usually retains many grammatical features from French, used postpositively and taking the forms manquée when modifying a feminine noun, manqués for a plural noun, and manquées for a feminine plural noun; as such, it is consciously regarded as a French term amidst English ones, and so occurs disproportionately more often in French contexts.
  • Manqué is sometimes written without its acute accent as manque; however, since this would imply the monosyllabic (as opposed to the standard disyllabic) pronunciations [mɑ̃k] (French), [mɒŋk] (RP), and [mɑŋk] (US), it may be regarded as a misspelling by many.

Coordinate terms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. 1.0 1.1 The Concise Oxford English Dictionary [Eleventh Edition]

Asturian[edit]

Verb[edit]

manqué

  1. first-person singular indefinite preterite indicative of mancar

French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

manqué m (feminine manquée, masculine plural manqués, feminine plural manquées)

  1. past participle of manquer

Derived terms[edit]