husk

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English huske (husk), from Old English *husuc, *hosuc (little covering, sheath), diminutive of hosu (pod, shell, husk), from Proto-Germanic *husōn, *hausaz (covering, shell, leggings), from Proto-Indo-European *kawəs- / kawes- (cover). More at hose, -ock.

Alternate etymology derives husk from Low German hūske (little house, sheath) (cognate with Middle Dutch huskjin > Dutch huisken, diminutive of hūs (house).)

Noun[edit]

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husk (plural husks)

  1. The dry, leafy or stringy exterior of certain vegetables or fruits, which must be removed before eating the meat inside
    A coconut has a very thick husk.
  2. Any form of useless, dried-up, and subsequently worthless exterior of something
    His attorney was a dried-up husk of a man.
  3. The supporting frame of a run of millstones.
Translations[edit]
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Verb[edit]

husk (third-person singular simple present husks, present participle husking, simple past and past participle husked)

  1. (transitive) To remove husks from.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Partly imitative, partly from Etymology 1, above, influenced by husky.

Verb[edit]

husk (third-person singular simple present husks, present participle husking, simple past and past participle husked)

  1. (transitive) To say huskily, to utter in a husky voice.
    • The French captain did not immediately respond; he looked at his men with a miserable expression [...]; still he hesitated, drooped, and finally husked, "Je me rends," with a look still more wretched. — Naomi Novik, "His Majesty's Dragon"

See also[edit]

References[edit]

The Australian Pocket Oxford Dictionary, 2nd Ed., Melbourne, Oxford University Press, 1978


Danish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

husk

  1. Imperative of huske. (remember)