pean

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See also: péan and peán

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /piːn/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -iːn

Noun[edit]

pean (plural peans)

  1. (heraldry) A heraldic fur of gold spots on a black field.

Adjective[edit]

pean (not comparable)

A coat of arms pean.
  1. (heraldry): In blazon, a heraldic fur of a black field. with gold spots
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pean (plural peans)

  1. Alternative spelling of paean.
    • 1843 February, I. D. W., “Association”, in James E. Ridgely, editor, The Covenant and Official Magazine of the Grand Lodge of the United States, I[ndependent] O[rder of] O[dd] F[ellows]: A Monthly Periodical Devoted to the Cause of Odd Fellowship, volume II, number 2, OCLC 877540713, page 68:
      The barbarian, wandering in nature's wilds, plucking the fruits as they grow, or destroying the game for his meat, and quenching his thirst with the waters of the gurgling rill, may furnish the poet with a theme for a pean to the goddess of Natural Liberty; but he will be a barbarian still, and his children after him, will roam over the same uncultivated wastes, and sleep in the same caves and dens, until they learn to associate with others and combine their efforts for mutual good.
    • 2007, Michael J. Mazarr, “The Existentialist Diagnosis”, in Unmodern Men in the Modern World: Radical Islam, Terrorism, and the War on Modernity, Cambridge; New York, N.Y.: Cambridge University Press, →ISBN, page 81:
      Antimodern romanticism is not primarily a complaint about lost nature; it is mainly a pean to lost values. Modernity is relativistic, the existentialists complain; it has lost a sense of real values, true courage, meaningful integrity.

Verb[edit]

pean (third-person singular simple present peans, present participle peaning, simple past and past participle peaned)

  1. Alternative spelling of paean.

Etymology 3[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pean (plural peans)

  1. Alternative spelling of peen.

Verb[edit]

pean (third-person singular simple present peans, present participle peaning, simple past and past participle peaned)

  1. Alternative spelling of peen.

Anagrams[edit]


Basque[edit]

Noun[edit]

pean

  1. inessive singular of pe

Estonian[edit]

Verb[edit]

pean

  1. first-person singular present indicative of pidama

Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Latin paeān, from Ancient Greek παιᾱ́ν (paiā́n).

Noun[edit]

pean m inan

  1. (Ancient Greece, historical) eulogy, paean (chant or song, especially a hymn of thanksgiving for deliverance or victory, to Apollo or sometimes another god or goddess)
  2. (by extension) paean (enthusiastic expression of praise)

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from French péan. Named after French surgeon Jules-Émile Péan (1830–1898).

Noun[edit]

pean m inan

  1. hemostat, pean
Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • pean in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • pean in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French péan.

Noun[edit]

pean n (plural peane)

  1. paean

Declension[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Verb[edit]

pean

  1. inflection of peer:
    1. third-person plural present subjunctive
    2. third-person plural imperative