argent

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English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English argent, from Old French argent (silver), from Latin argentum (white money, silver).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

argent (countable and uncountable, plural argents)

  1. (archaic) The metal silver.
  2. (heraldry) The white or silver tincture on a coat of arms.
    argent:  
    • 1909, Arthur Charles Fox-Davies, A Complete Guide to Heraldry
      The metals are gold and silver, these being termed "or" and "argent".
  3. (obsolete, poetic) Whiteness; anything that is white.

Translations[edit]

Adjective[edit]

argent (not comparable)

  1. Of silver or silver-coloured.
  2. (heraldry): of white or silver tincture on a coat of arms.
    • 1889, Charles Norton Elvin, A Dictionary of Heraldry:
      ... when the shield is argent, it is shown in an engraving by being left plain.

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

  • Ag (chemical symbol for silver)

See also[edit]

Quotations[edit]

The terms below need to be checked and allocated to the definitions (senses) of the headword above. Each term should appear in the sense for which it is appropriate. Use the templates {{syn|en|...}} or {{ant|en|...}} to add them to the appropriate sense(s).
  • 1667, Those argent Fields more likely habitants, / Translated Saints, or middle Spirits hold / Betwixt th' Angelical and Human kinde — John Milton, Paradise Lost
  • 1817, she did soar / So passionately bright, my dazzled soul / Commingling with her argent spheres did roll / Through clear and cloudy — John Keats, Endymion
  • 1817, Pardon me, airy planet, that I prize / One thought beyond thine argent luxuries! — John Keats, Endymion
  • 1818, Two wings this orb / Possess'd for glory, two fair argent wings — John Keats, Hyperion
  • 1819, At length burst in the argent revelry, / With plume, tiara, and all rich array, / Numerous as shadows haunting fairily / The brain — John Keats, The Eve of St Agnes
  • 1891,"A castle argent is certainly my crest," said he blandly. — Thomas Hardy, Tess of the d'Urbervilles
  • 1922, Like John o'Gaunt his name is dear to him, as dear as the coat and crest he toadied for, on a bend sable a spear or steeled argent, honorificabilitudinitatibus, dearer than his glory of greatest shakescene in the country. — James Joyce, Ulysses
  • 1922, Keep our flag flying! An eagle gules volant in a field argent displayed. — James Joyce, Ulysses
  • 1967, Argent I craft you as the star / Of flower-shut evening — John Berryman, Berryman's Sonnets

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Chemical element
Ag
Previous: pal·ladi (Pd)
Next: cadmi (Cd)

Etymology[edit]

From Old Occitan argent, from Latin argentum.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

argent m (uncountable)

  1. silver
    Synonym: plata
  2. (heraldry) argent

Further reading[edit]


French[edit]

French Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia fr

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French argent, from Old French argent, from Latin argentum (according to the TLFi etymological dictionary, a borrowing), itself from Proto-Italic *argentom, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂r̥ǵn̥tóm, from *h₂erǵ- (white).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

argent m (plural argents)

  1. silver
  2. money, cash
  3. (heraldry) argent (white in heraldry)

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Haitian Creole: ajan

References[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Middle French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French argent.

Noun[edit]

argent m (plural argens or argentz)

  1. silver (metal)
  2. silver (color)

Descendants[edit]


Norman[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French argent, from Latin argentum (possibly a borrowing), itself from Proto-Italic *argentom, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂r̥ǵn̥tóm, from *h₂erǵ- (white).

Noun[edit]

argent m (uncountable)

  1. silver
  2. (Jersey) snow-in-summer

Derived terms[edit]


Occitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Occitan argent, from Latin argentum.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (Lengadocian) IPA(key): [aɾˈd͡ʒen]
  • (Lemosin) IPA(key): [aʁˈd͡zɛ̃ⁿ]
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

argent m (plural argents)

  1. silver

Old French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin argentum, according to the TLFi etymological dictionary, an early borrowing[1].

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

argent m (oblique plural argenz or argentz, nominative singular argenz or argentz, nominative plural argent)

  1. silver (metal)
  2. silver (color)

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]


Old Occitan[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin argentum.

Noun[edit]

argent m (oblique plural argents, nominative singular argents, nominative plural argent)

  1. silver

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]