blanc

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See also: Blanc

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French blanc (white). Doublet of blank.

Noun[edit]

blanc (countable and uncountable, plural blancs)

  1. A white cosmetic.
    • 2013, M. C. Beaton, Rake's Progress:
      Had Miss Fipps not told her what they were, she would have taken them for ladies of fashion. In an age when women wore less than they had ever done but wore just as much blanc and rouge, there was little difference between the ladies in the side boxes and the ladies in the centre.
    • 2015, Richard Corson, James Glavan, Beverly Gore Norcross, Stage Makeup, page 322:
      A guest at a party in 1764 was described as wearing on her face "rather too much yellow mixed with the red; she . . . would look very agreeable if she added blanc to the rouge instead of gamboge."
    • 2020, Amelia Rauser, The Age of Undress, page 127:
      A white mask of cosmetic face paint, or blanc, had long been the norm for formally dressed ladies in the eighteenth century, but by the 1790s the deliberate artifice of the white mask was supplanted by a desire for a "natural" whiteness without additional coloring. "Rouge is no longer used; pallor is more interesting," wrote one commentator in 1804; "The ladies only use the blanc, and leave the rouge to the men."
  2. A white sauce of fat, broth, and vegetables, used especially for braised meat.

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Inherited from Early Medieval Latin blancus, from Proto-Germanic *blankaz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

blanc (feminine blanca, masculine plural blancs, feminine plural blanques)

  1. white

Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

blanc m (plural blancs)

  1. white
  2. target (for shooting practice)
  3. blank (empty space)

See also[edit]

Colors in Catalan · colors (layout · text)
     blanc      gris      negre
             roig, vermell; carmesí              taronja; marró              groc; crema
             verd llima              verd             
             cian; xarxet              atzur              blau
             violat; indi              magenta; lila, porpra              rosa

Further reading[edit]

Dalmatian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From early Medieval Latin blancus, perhaps via Old Venetian blanco. Compare also Italian bianco.

Adjective[edit]

blanc m (plural blance, feminine blanca)

  1. white

Synonyms[edit]

References[edit]

  • Bartoli, Matteo Giulio (1906) Il Dalmatico: Resti di un’antica lingua romanza parlata da Veglia a Ragusa e sua collocazione nella Romània appenino-balcanica, Istituto della Enciclopedia Italiana, published 2000

Franco-Provençal[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Inherited from Early Medieval Latin blancus.

Adjective[edit]

blanc m (feminine singular blanchi, masculine plural blancs, feminine plural blanches)

  1. white

References[edit]

  • blanc in DicoFranPro: Dictionnaire Français/Francoprovençal – on dicofranpro.llm.umontreal.ca

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Inherited from Middle French blanc, from Old French blanc, from early Medieval Latin blancus, a borrowing of Frankish *blank, from Proto-Germanic *blankaz (bright, shining, blinding, white), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰleyǵ- (to shine).

Akin to Old High German blanch (bright, white) (German blank (polished, naked)), Old Norse blankr (white) (Danish blank (bright, shiny)), Dutch blank (white, shining). More at blink, blank.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

blanc (feminine blanche, masculine plural blancs, feminine plural blanches)

  1. white color
    Ce lait est blanc.This milk is white.
  2. blank, unused
  3. (figurative, one's look) blank, without expression

Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

blanc m (plural blancs)

  1. white (color)
  2. silence while in a dialog
  3. empty space, on a leaf of paper or in a form
    Inscrivez votre nom dans le blanc en bas de la page.
    Write your name in the blank at the bottom of the page.
  4. (informal) white wine
    Le poisson se mange avec du blanc.
    fish is eaten with white wine.
  5. white person, person with a white complexion
    • 2015, Ilham Maad, Noir, pas black[1]:
      C’est qu’en France, les blancs n’existent pas et par contre la façon de parler des nonblancs existe et évolue avec le temps. Parce qu’effectivement, d’abord on était sur des termes purement et simplement racistes avec « bamboula, negro, nègre, bicot, bougnoule » et puis après ça a évolué et on est arrivé à « black, beur »… Donc je sais pas quand est-ce que ça a commencé exactement, moi je marque ça aux années 80, le hip hop, voilà, la black music…
      In France, there are no Whites, but names for non-Whites are constantly evolving. First we had terms that were purely and simply racist, like jigaboo, negro, nigger, coon, sambo... That evolved until we got to Black, Brownie... I'm not sure when that came in, but I guess it was the 1980s, with hip-hop and "Black music."
  6. albumen, egg white
  7. white meat
  8. correction fluid, whiteout, Tippex

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Antillean Creole: blan
  • Guianese Creole: blan
  • Haitian Creole: blan
  • Karipúna Creole French: blã
  • Louisiana Creole: blan, blon
  • Seychellois Creole: blan
  • Tayo: bla
  • Romanian: blanc

See also[edit]

Colors in French · couleurs (layout · text)
     blanc      gris      noir
             rouge; cramoisi, carmin              orange; brun, marron              jaune; crème
             lime              vert              menthe
             cyan, turquoise; bleu canard              azur, bleu ciel              bleu
             violet, lilas; indigo              magenta; pourpre              rose

Further reading[edit]

Friulian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From early Medieval Latin blancus (compare Ladin blanch, Italian bianco, French blanc, Spanish blanco, Portuguese branco), from Proto-Germanic *blankaz (bright, shining, blinding, white), from Proto-Indo-European *bhleg- (to shine).

Adjective[edit]

blanc

  1. white

Interlingua[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

blanc (comparative plus blanc, superlative le plus blanc)

  1. white (having a light colour, reflecting all light)
  2. white (having a light skin colour, mostly associated with European descent)

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Colors in Interlingua · colores (layout · text)
     blanc, albe      gris      nigre
             rubie              orange; brun              jalne; crema
             verde lima              verde              verde mentha, acquamarine
             cyano              azure              blau
             violette; indigo              magenta; purpure              rosate

Middle French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French blanc.

Noun[edit]

blanc m (uncountable)

  1. white

Adjective[edit]

blanc m (feminine singular blanche, masculine plural blancs, feminine plural blanches)

  1. white

Descendants[edit]

  • French: blanc (see there for further descendants)

Occitan[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Occitan blanc, from early Medieval Latin blancus (compare Catalan and French blanc, Spanish blanco, Portuguese branco, Italian bianco), from Proto-Germanic *blankaz (bright, shining, blinding, white), from Proto-Indo-European *bhleg- (to shine).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

blanc m (feminine singular blanca, masculine plural blancs, feminine plural blancas)

  1. white

Old English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *blankaz (bright", "shining", "blinding", "white), from Proto-Indo-European *bhleg- (to shine). Akin to Old High German blanch, planch (bright", "white), hence German blank (blank", "white), Old Norse blankr (white), hence Danish blank (shiny), Swedish blank (shiny), Dutch blank (white", "shining).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

blanc

  1. white
  2. greyish-white, pale, pallid

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From early Medieval Latin blancus, from Frankish *blank, from Proto-Germanic *blankaz (bright, shining, blinding, white), from Proto-Indo-European *bhleg- (to shine).

Akin to Old High German blanch "bright, white" (German blank (blank, white)), Old Norse blankr (white) (Danish blank (bright, shiny)), Dutch blank (white, shining). More at blink, blind.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

blanc m (oblique and nominative feminine singular blanche)

  1. white

Declension[edit]

Noun[edit]

blanc oblique singularm (oblique plural blans, nominative singular blans, nominative plural blanc)

  1. white (color)
    • c. 1170, Chrétien de Troyes, Érec et Énide:
      Ses haubers est coverz de sanc:
      De roge i a plus que de blanc.
      His chainmail is covered in blood
      There's more red than white (referring to his white chainmail)

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Old Occitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From early Medieval Latin blancus, from Frankish *blank, from Proto-Germanic *blankaz (bright, shining, blinding, white), from Proto-Indo-European *bhleg- (to shine).

Adjective[edit]

blanc m (feminine singular blancha, masculine plural blancs, feminine plural blanchas)

  1. white

Descendants[edit]

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French blanc.

Noun[edit]

blanc n (plural blancuri)

  1. white space

Declension[edit]

References[edit]

  • blanc in Academia Română, Micul dicționar academic, ediția a II-a, Bucharest: Univers Enciclopedic, 2010. →ISBN

Walloon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French blanc, from early Medieval Latin blancus, from Frankish *blank, from Proto-Germanic *blankaz (bright, shining, blinding, white), from Proto-Indo-European *bhleg- (to shine).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

blanc m (feminine singular blanke, masculine plural blancs, feminine plural blankes, feminine plural (before noun) blankès)

  1. white

Noun[edit]

blanc m

  1. white