vert

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See also: 'vert, vért, vèrt, vērt, and vërt

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English vert, borrowed from Old French vert, from Vulgar Latin virdis, syncopated from Classical Latin viridis. Doublet of virid, which was borrowed directly from Latin.

Noun[edit]

vert (countable and uncountable, plural verts)

  1. (heraldry) A green colour, now only in heraldry; represented in engraving by diagonal parallel lines 45 degrees counter-clockwise.
    vert:  
  2. (archaic) Green undergrowth or other vegetation growing in a forest, as a potential cover for deer.
  3. (archaic) The right to fell trees or cut shrubs in a forest.
    • 1819, Walter Scott, Ivanhoe:
      “I understand thee,” said the King, “and the Holy Clerk shall have a grant of vert and venison in my woods of Warncliffe.”
Translations[edit]
See also[edit]

Adjective[edit]

vert (comparative more vert, superlative most vert)

  1. (heraldry) In blazon, of the colour green.
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Abbreviation of vertical.

Noun[edit]

vert (plural verts)

  1. (colloquial) In sport, a type of bicycle stunt competition.
  2. A vertical surface used by skateboarders or skiers.

Etymology 3[edit]

Abbreviation of vertebrate.

Noun[edit]

vert (plural verts)

  1. (biology, informal) vertebrate

Etymology 4[edit]

From Latin vertere.

Verb[edit]

vert (third-person singular simple present verts, present participle verting, simple past and past participle verted)

  1. (Can we verify(+) this sense?) To turn.
    • 1578 November 7, Extracts from the Council Register of the Burgh of Aberdeen. 1570—1625., volume II, Aberdeen: [] the Spalding Club, published 1848, page 32:
      [] it sall be lesum to quhatsumewir personne apprehendand the said swyne in thair awin skaytht, or thair nichtbouris skaytht, or vpon the commountie of Castelhill, Womanhill, Kirkyard, or Linx vertand the ertht, to distroy the samen [].
    • c. 1590, John Stewart of Baldynneis, “Roland Furious”, in Donna Heddle, editor, John Stewart of Baldynneis Roland Furious, Leiden; Boston, Mass.: Brill, published 2008, →ISBN, page 92:
      His sourd so snell als thick did clinck and clak / Quhair evir he verts his force and awfull face, [].
    • 1659, Thomas Fuller, “The Eleventh Book, Containing the Reign of K. Charls”, in The Appeal of Iniured Innocence: unto the Religious Learned and Ingenuous Reader. In a Controversie Betwixt the Animadvertor Dr. Peter Heylyn and the Author Thomas Fuller., London: [] W. Godbid, [], part III, page 21:
      Theſe are Ani-mad-versions indeed, when a Writers words are madly verted, inverted, perverted, againſt his true intent, and their Grammaticall ſenſe.
    • 1859, George Meredith, “In Which the Hero Takes a Step”, in The Ordeal of Richard Feverel. A History of Father and Son. [], volume II, London: Chapman and Hall, OCLC 213819910, page 198:
      Hippias not only came aboveground, he flew about in the very skies, verting like any blithe creature of the season.
    • 1879 December 6, J[ames] Matthews Duncan, “On Retention of Mucus”, in The Medical Times and Gazette. A Journal of Medical Science, Literature, Criticism, and News., volume II, number 1536, London: [] J. & A. Churchill, [], page 630:
      A lady had ulceration of the interior of the body of the uterus, which was not flexed or verted: [].
    • 1903 February 7, R. C. Matheny, “Imbalance and Insufficiency of the Eye Muscles”, in George F[rederick] Shrady [Sr.] and Thomas L[athrop] Stedman, editors, Medical Record: A Weekly Journal of Medicine and Surgery, volume 63, number 6 (whole 1683), New York, N.Y.: William Wood and Company, page 210:
      For instance, all of the muscles of the eyes may be relatively weak. The ducting or verting power is not as great as it should be.

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French vert, from Vulgar Latin virdis, syncopated from Classical Latin viridis. Cf. Italian, Portuguese, and Spanish verde.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

vert m (plural verts)

  1. green

Adjective[edit]

vert (feminine verte, masculine plural verts, feminine plural vertes)

  1. green

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Haitian Creole: vèt,
  • Louisiana Creole French: , vèr, vær
  • Wolof: wert

See also[edit]

Colors in French · couleurs (layout · text)
     blanc      gris      noir
             rouge; cramoisi              orange; brun              jaune; crème
             vert citron              vert              menthe
             cyan; bleu canard              azur              bleu
             violet; indigo              magenta; pourpre              rose

Further reading[edit]


Friulian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin virdis, syncopated from Latin viridis. Compare Italian verde.

Adjective[edit]

vert

  1. green

Related terms[edit]


Hungarian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

ver +‎ -t

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

vert

  1. third-person singular indicative past indefinite of ver

Participle[edit]

vert

  1. past participle of ver

Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Old French vert, from Vulgar Latin virdis, syncopated from Classical Latin viridis.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

vert (uncountable)

  1. (cooking, heraldry) Green-coloured.

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

Noun[edit]

vert (uncountable)

  1. (law) Any plant having green leaves.
  2. (rare, especially heraldry) green

References[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Low German wert.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

vert m (definite singular verten, indefinite plural verter, definite plural vertene)

  1. a host (also in biology)
  2. a landlord

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Middle Low German wert.

Noun[edit]

vert m (definite singular verten, indefinite plural vertar, definite plural vertane)

  1. a host (also in biology)
  2. a landlord

Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

vert

  1. present tense of verta/verte
  2. imperative of verta/verte

References[edit]


Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin virdis, syncopated from Classical Latin viridis. Compare Italian verde and Spanish verde.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /vert/, (later) /vɛrt/

Noun[edit]

vert m (oblique plural verz or vertz, nominative singular verz or vertz, nominative plural vert)

  1. green

Adjective[edit]

vert m (oblique and nominative feminine singular vert)

  1. green, of a green color

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Walloon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French vert, from Vulgar Latin virdis, syncopated from Classical Latin viridis. Cf. French vert, Italian verde and Spanish verde.

Adjective[edit]

vert

  1. green