deer

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English[edit]

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A deer (1)

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English deere, dere, der, dier, deor ‎(small animal, deer), from Old English dēor, dīor ‎(an animal, beast, any sort of wild animal, wild beast; deer, reindeer), from Proto-Germanic *deuzą ‎(animal), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰewsóm ‎(living thing), from *dʰéws ‎(breath), full-grade derivative of *dʰwés-. Cognate with Scots dere, deir ‎(deer), North Frisian dier ‎(animal, beast), West Frisian dier ‎(animal, beast), Dutch dier ‎(animal, beast), German Low German Deer, Deert ‎(animal), German Tier ‎(animal, beast), Swedish djur ‎(animal, beast), Icelandic dýr ‎(animal, beast). Related also to Albanian dash ‎(ram), Lithuanian daũsos ‎(upper air; heaven), Lithuanian dùsti ‎(to sigh), Russian душа́ ‎(dušá, breath, spirit), Lithuanian dvėsti ‎(to breath, exhale), Sanskrit ध्वंसति ‎(dhvaṃsati, he falls to dust). For semantic development compare Latin animalis ‎(animal), from anima ‎(breath, spirit).

Noun[edit]

deer ‎(plural deer or deers)

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  1. A ruminant mammal with antlers and hooves of the family Cervidae, or one of several similar animals from related families of the order Artiodactyla.
  2. (in particular) One of the smaller animals of this family, distinguished from a moose or elk.
    I wrecked my car after a deer ran across the road.
  3. The meat of such an animal; venison.
    Oh, I've never had deer before.
  4. (obsolete, chiefly in the phrase "small deer") A beast, especially a quadruped and especially a mammal, as opposed to a bird, fish, etc.
    • (Can we date this quote?) William Shakespeare, King Lear, Act III. IV:
      But mice and rats and such small deer, have been Tom's food for seven long year.

Hyponyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

deer

  1. first-person singular present indicative of deren
  2. imperative of deren

Limburgish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *deuzą, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰeusóm. Cognate with English deer (Old English dēor), Dutch dier, German Tier, Swedish djur; and with Lithuanian dvēsti, Russian душа́ ‎(dušá).

Noun[edit]

deer n

  1. pet
  2. (obsolete) beast, animal

Inflection[edit]

Inflection
Root singular Root plural Diminutive singular Diminutive plural
Nominative deer deer deerke deerkes
Genitive deers deer deerkes deerkes
Locative daer daer daerke daerkes
Dative* daerem daerer ? ?
Accusative* deer ? deerke deerkes
  • The dative and accusative are obsolete nowadays, use the nominative instead.