hind

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English[edit]

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Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English hinde, from Old English hindan ‎(at the rear, from behind), from Proto-Germanic *hinda-, *handan- ‎(far, beyond), from Proto-Indo-European *k(')enta ‎(down, below, with, far, along, against), from *ḱen- ‎(to set oneself in motion, arise). Cognate with Gothic 𐌷𐌹𐌽𐌳𐌰𐌽𐌰 ‎(hindana, from beyond), Old Norse hindr ‎(obstacle), Old Norse handan ‎(from that side, beyond), Old High German hintana ‎(behind), Old English hinder ‎(behind, back, in the farthest part, down), Latin contra ‎(in return, against). More at hinder, contrary.

Adjective[edit]

hind ‎(comparative hinder, superlative hindmost)

  1. Located at the rear (most often said of animals' body parts).
    • 1918, Edgar Rice Burroughs, The Land That Time Forgot Chapter V
      When it had advanced from the wood, it hopped much after the fashion of a kangaroo, using its hind feet and tail to propel it, and when it stood erect, it sat upon its tail.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Wikispecies has information on:

Wikispecies Old English hind, from Proto-Germanic, from a formation on Proto-Indo-European *ḱem- ‎(hornless). Cognate with Dutch hinde, German Hinde, Danish hind.

Noun[edit]

hind ‎(plural hinds)

  1. A female deer, especially a red deer at least two years old.
    • 1621, Robert Burton, The Anatomy of Melancholy, III.1.3:
      Nature binds all creatures to love their young ones; an hen to preserve her brood will run upon a lion, an hind will fight with a bull, a sow with a bear, a silly sheep with a fox.
  2. A spotted food fish of the genus Epinephelus.
Synonyms[edit]
  • (female deer): doe
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Old English hī(ġ)na, genitive plural of hīġa ‎(servant, family member), in the phrase hīna fæder ‘paterfamilias’. The -d is a later addition (compare sound).

Noun[edit]

hind ‎(plural hinds)

  1. (archaic) A servant, especially an agricultural labourer.
    • 1603, John Florio, translating Michel de Montaigne, Essays, I.51:
      Attilius Regulus [] writ unto the common-wealth, that a hyne [transl. valet de labourage] or plough-boy, whom he had left alone to oversee and husband his land (which in all was but seven acres of ground) was run away from his charge [].
    • 1827, Maria Elizabeth Budden, Nina, An Icelandic Tale, page 41:
      The peaceful tenour of Nina's life was interrupted one morning by the mysterious looks and whisperings of her maids and hinds.
    • 1931, Pearl S. Buck, The Good Earth:
      that my brother can sit at leisure in a seat and learn something and I must work like a hind, who am your son as well as he!

For more examples of usage of this term, see Citations:hind.


Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse hind, from Proto-Germanic.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

hind c (singular definite hinden, plural indefinite hinder or hinde)

  1. hind (female deer)

Inflection[edit]


Estonian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Finnic *hinta. Cognate with Finnish hinta.

Noun[edit]

hind ‎(genitive hinna, partitive hinda)

  1. price

Declension[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.


Faroese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Noun[edit]

hind f (genitive singular hindar, plural hindir)

  1. membrane
Declension[edit]
f2 Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative hind hindin hindir hindirnar
Accusative hind hindina hindir hindirnar
Dative hind hindini hindum hindunum
Genitive hindar hindarinnar hinda hindanna
Synonyms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse hind, from Proto-Germanic.

Noun[edit]

hind f (genitive singular hindar, plural hindir)

  1. hind (female deer)
Declension[edit]
f2 Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative hind hindin hindir hindirnar
Accusative hind hindina hindir hindirnar
Dative hind hindini hindum hindunum
Genitive hindar hindarinnar hinda hindanna

Icelandic[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

hind f ‎(genitive singular hindar, nominative plural hindir)

  1. female deer, hind

Declension[edit]


Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *hindō, whence also Old High German hinta, Old Norse hind.

Noun[edit]

hind f

  1. hind

Scots[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Early Scots hyne ‎(stripling), from Northumbrian Old English hīȝu or hīȝan ‎(members of a household).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

hind (plural hinds)

  1. (archaic) A skilled labourer on a farm, especially a ploughman. In Southern Scotland, specifically a married skilled farmworker given housing in a cottage and often given special privileges in addition to his wages. Occasionally a derogatory term.

Derived terms[edit]

  • hindin ‎(the act of being a hind)
  • hindish ‎(to be like a hind; rustic)

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Swedish hind, cognate with Old High German hinta, German Hinde, English hind.

Noun[edit]

hind c

  1. a doe, a hind; the female of deer
    skygg som en hind
    shy as a doe
    Man kan ej för samma kärra spänna en häst och en hind
    One can not harness to the same cart a horse and a trembling doe

Declension[edit]

References[edit]