hinder

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English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English hindrian, from Proto-Germanic *hindrōną (to put back), from *hinder (back) (adverb). Cognate with Dutch hinderen and German hindern, Latin contra (back, against).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

hinder (third-person singular simple present hinders, present participle hindering, simple past and past participle hindered)

  1. (transitive) To make difficult to accomplish; to frustrate, act as obstacle.
    A drought hinders the growth of plants.
    • 2011 December 10, David Ornstein, “Arsenal 1 - 0 Everton”, BBC Sport:
      Arsenal were playing without a recognised full-back - their defence comprising four centre-halves - and the lack of width was hindering their progress.
    • 1599, William Shakespeare, Henry V act ii, scene 2 (act i; First Folio ed.):
      Since God ſo graciouſly hath brought to light
      This dangerous Treaſon, lurking in our way,
      To hinder our beginnings.
  2. (transitive) To keep back; to delay or impede; to prevent.
    • 1591, William Shakespeare, The Two Gentlemen of Verona act ii, scene 7 (First Folio ed.):
      Then let me goe, and hinder not my courſe
    • John Locke
      What hinders younger brothers, being fathers of families, from having the same right?
  3. (transitive, obsolete) To cause harm.
Quotations[edit]
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Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

comparative form of hind: more hind

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

hinder (not comparable)

  1. Of or belonging to that part or end which is in the rear or hind, or which follows.
    the hinder end of a wagon
    the hinder parts of a horse
    • 1990 - C. W. H. Havard (ed.), Black's Medical Dictionary, 36th edition, p 673
      On a line dividing the front two-thirds from the hinder one-third, and set in the shape of a V, is a row of seven to twelve large flat-topped circumvallate papillae, ...
  2. comparative form of hind: more hind
Usage notes[edit]

Most current uses of this adjective occur in anatomical contexts.

Quotations[edit]
Synonyms[edit]
Antonyms[edit]
  • (of or belonging to that part in the rear): fore, front
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

hinder (plural hinders)

  1. (slang, euphemistic) The buttocks.
    • 1997, Richard Laliberte and Stephen C. George, The Men's Health Guide to Peak Conditioning [1], ISBN 0875963234, page 195:
      Like martial arts, in-line skating is predicated on the notion that sooner or later you're going to end up on your hinder.
Quotations[edit]
Translations[edit]

Danish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From hindre (to hinder). Cognate to German Low German hinder, hinter and Old Norse hindr.

Noun[edit]

hinder n

  1. hindrance, obstacle, impediment, obstruction
    • være til hinder
      to be in the way
    • Der er intet til hinder for at ...
      There is nothing in the way (no obstacle against it), to ...
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

See hind.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

hinder c

  1. plural indefinite of hind

Etymology 3[edit]

See hinde.

Noun[edit]

hinder c

  1. plural indefinite of hinde

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch hinder

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Noun[edit]

hinder m (uncountable)

  1. hindrance, impediment, obstruction

Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

hinder

  1. first-person singular present indicative of hinderen
  2. imperative of hinderen

German[edit]

Verb[edit]

hinder

  1. First-person singular present of hindern.
  2. Imperative singular of hindern.

Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Noun[edit]

hinder n

  1. obstacle, impediment, obstruction

Declension[edit]

Usage notes[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]