hamper

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English[edit]

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A selection of wicker hampers.
An outline of a hamper.

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English hamper, contracted from hanaper, hanypere, from Anglo-Norman hanaper, Old French hanapier, hanepier ‎(case for holding a large goblet or cup), from hanap ‎(goblet, drinking cup), from Old Frankish *hnapp ‎(cup, bowl, basin), from Proto-Germanic *hnappaz ‎(cup, bowl). Cognate with Old High German hnapf ‎(cup, bowl, basin) (German Napf ‎(bowl)), Dutch nap ‎(cup), Old English hnæpp ‎(bowl). More at nap.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

hamper ‎(plural hampers)

  1. A large basket, usually with a cover, used for the packing and carrying of articles or small animals; as,
    a hamper of wine
    a clothes hamper
    an oyster hamper, which contains two bushels
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

hamper ‎(third-person singular simple present hampers, present participle hampering, simple past and past participle hampered)

  1. (transitive) To put into a hamper.
    Competition pigeons are hampered for the truck trip to the point of release where the race back starts.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English hamperen, hampren ‎(to hamper, oppress), probably of the same origin as English hamble ‎(to limp), Scots hamp ‎(to halt in walking, stutter), Dutch haperen ‎(to falter, hesitate), German hemmen ‎(to stop, hinder, check). More at hamble.

Verb[edit]

hamper ‎(third-person singular simple present hampers, present participle hampering, simple past and past participle hampered)

  1. (transitive) To put a hamper or fetter on; to shackle; to ensnare; to inveigle; hence, to impede in motion or progress; to embarrass; to encumber.
    • 1712, Richard Blackmore, Creation: A Philosophical Poem:
      Engend'ring heats, these one by one unbind, Stretch their small tubes, and hamper'd nerves unwind.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Roger L'Estrange,:
      A lion hampered in a net.
    • (Can we date this quote?) John Tillotson, The Advantages of Religion:
      They hamper and entangle our souls.
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

hamper ‎(plural hampers)

  1. A shackle; a fetter; anything which impedes.
  2. (nautical) Articles ordinarily indispensable, but in the way at certain times.
Derived terms[edit]
  • Top hamper, (Nautical): unnecessary spars and rigging kept aloft.
Translations[edit]