nap

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See also: Nap and NAP

English[edit]

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Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English nappen, from Old English hnappian ‎(to doze, slumber, sleep), from Proto-Germanic *hnappōną ‎(to nap). Cognate with Old High German hnaffezan, hnaffezzan (> Middle High German nafzen ‎(to slumber) > German dialectal napfezen, nafzen ‎(to nod, slumber, nap)).

Noun[edit]

nap ‎(plural naps)

  1. A short period of sleep, especially one during the day
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
See also[edit]

See Appendix:Collocations of do, have, make, and take for collocations of nap

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

nap ‎(third-person singular simple present naps, present participle napping, simple past and past participle napped)

  1. to have a nap; to sleep for a short period of time, especially during the day
  2. to be off one's guard
    • Hudibras
      I took thee napping, unprepared.
    The regulators were caught napping by the financial collapse.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
Synonyms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English nappe, from Middle Dutch

Noun[edit]

nap ‎(countable and uncountable, plural naps)

  1. A soft or fuzzy surface on fabric or leather.
    • 1591, King Henry VI part II, by William Shakespeare
      I tell thee, Jack Cade the clothier means to dress the commonwealth, and turn it, and set a new nap upon it.
    • 1851, Herman Melville, Moby Dick, chapter 16
      On his long, gaunt body, he carried no spare flesh, no superfluous beard, his chin having a soft, economical nap to it, like the worn nap of his broad-brimmed hat.
    • 1939, Raymond Chandler, The Big Sleep, Penguin 2011, p. 37:
      There were low bookshelves, there was a thick pinkish Chinese rug in which a gopher could have spent a week without showing his nose above the nap.
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

nap ‎(third-person singular simple present naps, present participle napping, simple past and past participle napped)

  1. to form or raise a soft or fuzzy surface on (fabric or leather)

Etymology 3[edit]

  • From the name of the French emperor Napoleon I of France (Bonaparte)

Noun[edit]

nap ‎(plural naps)

  1. (Britain) A type of bet in British horse racing, based on the experts' best tips
  2. (uncountable, card games) A card game in which players take tricks; properly Napoleon
  3. A bid to take five tricks in the card game Napoleon.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

Possibly of North Germanic origin, cognate with nab, see Swedish nappa ‎(to pinch).

Verb[edit]

nap ‎(third-person singular simple present naps, present participle napping, simple past and past participle napped)

  1. (obsolete) to grab; to nab
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 5[edit]

From French napper, from nappe ‎(nape).

Verb[edit]

nap ‎(third-person singular simple present naps, present participle napping, simple past and past participle napped)

  1. (cooking) To cover (something) with a sauce (usually in passive)
    • 2006, Wayne Gisslen, Mary Ellen Griffin, Professional Cooking for Canadian Chefs‎:
      Vanilla ice cream topped with a poached or canned pear half, napped with chocolate sauce, and garnished with toasted sliced almonds.

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin napus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

nap m ‎(plural naps)

  1. turnip, Brassica rapa

Chuukese[edit]

Adjective[edit]

nap

  1. great

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch nap, from Old Dutch nap, from Proto-Germanic *hnappaz.

Noun[edit]

nap m ‎(plural nappen, diminutive napje n)

  1. drinking cup

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Hungarian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Of unknown origin.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

nap ‎(plural napok)

  1. day
    Egy hét 7 napból áll. - A week consists of 7 days.
  2. sun (also written Nap in astronomical context)
    Süt a nap. - The sun is shining.

Declension[edit]

Inflection (stem in -o-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative nap napok
accusative napot napokat
dative napnak napoknak
instrumental nappal napokkal
causal-final napért napokért
translative nappá napokká
terminative napig napokig
essive-formal napként napokként
essive-modal
inessive napban napokban
superessive napon napokon
adessive napnál napoknál
illative napba napokba
sublative napra napokra
allative naphoz napokhoz
elative napból napokból
delative napról napokról
ablative naptól napoktól
Possessive forms of nap
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. napom napjaim
2nd person sing. napod napjaid
3rd person sing. napja napjai
1st person plural napunk napjaink
2nd person plural napotok napjaitok
3rd person plural napjuk napjaik

Derived terms[edit]

(Compound words):

(Expressions):

External links[edit]

  • nap in Hungarian-English dictionary at SZTAKI

Occitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin napus

Noun[edit]

nap m (plural naps)

  1. turnip Brassica rapa

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin nāpus.

Noun[edit]

nap m ‎(plural napi)

  1. turnip or swede (Brassica napus)
  2. carrot

Declension[edit]

See also[edit]