grab

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See also: Grab

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Dutch grabben ‎(to grab) or Middle Low German grabben ‎(to snap), from Proto-Germanic *grab-, from Proto-Indo-European *gʰrebʰ- (compare Sanskrit गृह्णाति ‎(gṛhṇāti), गृभ्णाति ‎(gṛbhṇāti, he seizes), Avestan 𐬔𐬀𐬭𐬆𐬡 ‎(garəβ, to seize)). Cognate with Danish grabbe ‎(to grab), Swedish grabba ‎(to grab), Old English ġegræppian ‎(to seize), Macedonian грабне ‎(grabne, to snatch),

Verb[edit]

grab ‎(third-person singular simple present grabs, present participle grabbing, simple past and past participle grabbed)

  1. (transitive) To grip suddenly; to seize; to clutch.
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 7, Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      Old Applegate, in the stern, just set and looked at me, and Lord James, amidship, waved both arms and kept hollering for help. I took a couple of everlasting big strokes and managed to grab hold of the skiff's rail, close to the stern.
    I grabbed her hand to pull her back from the cliff edge.
  2. (intransitive) To make a sudden grasping or clutching motion (at something).
    The suspect suddenly broke free and grabbed at the policeman's gun.
  3. To restrain someone; to arrest.
  4. To grip the attention; to enthrall.
  5. (informal) To quickly collect or retrieve.
    • 1987 James Grady Just a Shot Away, Bantam, page 117:
      "I'll just grab my jacket," said Manh-Hung.
    • 1999 Jillian Dagg, Racing Hearts, Thomas Bouregy & Co., page 105:
      Hardly believing that Rafe actually planned to relax for a while, Kate nodded. "All right. Fine. I'll just go grab my purse."
    • 2009 Mike Taylor, A Thousand Sleeps, Tate Publishing, page 216:
      He looked at Albert and Ben, and then back to Nurse Allen. "I'll just grab my gear and be right back."
  6. (informal) To consume something quickly.
    We'll just grab a sandwich and then we'll be on our way.
    Is there time to grab a coffee?
  7. To take the opportunity of.
    • 2012 May 19, Paul Fletcher, “Blackpool 1-2 West Ham”, BBC Sport:
      Both teams wasted good opportunities to score but it was the London side who did grab what proved to be the decisive third when the unmarked Vaz Te, a January signing from Barnsley, drilled the ball into the net from 12 yards.
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

grab ‎(plural grabs)

  1. a sudden snatch (for something)
    • 1931 Harold M. Sherman, "The Baseball Clown," Boys' Life, volume 21, No. 4 (April 1931), Boy Scouts of America, page 47:
      The ball popped in and popped out, and when he made a grab for it on the ground he kicked it with his foot.
    • 2003 J Davey, Six Years of Darkness, Trafford Publishing, page 66:
      He made a grab for me and I swung my handbag at him as hard as I could.
  2. a mechanical device that grabs or clutches
    1. a device for withdrawing drills, etc., from artesian and other wells that are drilled, bored, or driven
  3. (media) a soundbite
Derived terms[edit]
Synonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Etymology 2[edit]

Arabic and Hindi ghurb?: crow, raven, a kind of Arab ship.

Noun[edit]

grab ‎(plural grabs)

  1. A two- or three-masted vessel used on the Malabar coast.

Anagrams[edit]


Lower Sorbian[edit]

grab

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *grabrъ.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

grab m

  1. hornbeam (tree of genus Carpinus)

Declension[edit]


Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia pl

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *grab(r)ъ, from Proto-Indo-European *grābʰ-

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

grab m inan

  1. hornbeam, any tree of genus Carpinus.

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *grab(r)ъ, from Proto-Indo-European *grābʰ-

Noun[edit]

grab m (Cyrillic spelling граб)

  1. hornbeam

Declension[edit]