grab

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See also: Grab

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Dutch grabben (to grab) or Middle Low German grabben (to snap), from Proto-Germanic *grab-, from Proto-Indo-European *gʰerebʰ- (compare Sanskrit गृह्णाति (gṛhṇāti, he seizes), गृभ्णाति (gṛbhṇāti), Avestan 𐬔𐬀𐬭𐬆𐬡 (garəβ, to seize)). Cognate with Danish grabbe (to grab), Swedish grabba (to grab), Old English ġegræppian (to seize).

Verb[edit]

grab (third-person singular simple present grabs, present participle grabbing, simple past and past participle grabbed)

  1. (transitive) To grip suddenly; to seize; to clutch.
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 7, Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      Old Applegate, in the stern, just set and looked at me, and Lord James, amidship, waved both arms and kept hollering for help. I took a couple of everlasting big strokes and managed to grab hold of the skiff's rail, close to the stern.
    I grabbed her hand to pull her back from the cliff edge.
  2. (intransitive) To make a sudden grasping or clutching motion (at something).
    The suspect suddenly broke free and grabbed at the policeman's gun.
  3. To restrain someone; to arrest.
  4. To grip the attention; to enthrall.
  5. (informal) To quickly collect or retrieve.
    • 1987 James Grady Just a Shot Away, Bantam, p117
      "I'll just grab my jacket," said Manh-Hung.
    • 1999 Jillian Dagg, Racing Hearts, Thomas Bouregy & Co., p105
      Hardly believing that Rafe actually planned to relax for a while, Kate nodded. "All right. Fine. I'll just go grab my purse."
    • 2009 Mike Taylor, A Thousand Sleeps, Tate Publishing, p216
      He looked at Albert and Ben, and then back to Nurse Allen. "I'll just grab my gear and be right back."
  6. (informal) To consume something quickly.
    We'll just grab a sandwich and then we'll be on our way.
    Is there time to grab a coffee?
  7. To take the opportunity of.
    • 2012 May 19, Paul Fletcher, “Blackpool 1-2 West Ham”, BBC Sport:
      Both teams wasted good opportunities to score but it was the London side who did grab what proved to be the decisive third when the unmarked Vaz Te, a January signing from Barnsley, drilled the ball into the net from 12 yards.
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

grab (plural grabs)

  1. a sudden snatch (for something)
    • 1931 Harold M. Sherman, "The Baseball Clown," Boys' Life, Vol. 21, No. 4 (April 1931), Boy Scouts of America, p47
      The ball popped in and popped out, and when he made a grab for it on the ground he kicked it with his foot.
    • 2003 J Davey, Six Years of Darkness, Trafford Publishing, p66
      He made a grab for me and I swung my handbag at him as hard as I could.
  2. a mechanical device that grabs or clutches
    1. a device for withdrawing drills, etc., from artesian and other wells that are drilled, bored, or driven
  3. (media) a soundbite
Derived terms[edit]
Synonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Etymology 2[edit]

Arabic and Hindi ghurb?: crow, raven, a kind of Arab ship.

Noun[edit]

grab (plural grabs)

  1. A two- or three-masted vessel used on the Malabar coast.

Anagrams[edit]


Lower Sorbian[edit]

grab

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *grabrъ.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

grab m

  1. hornbeam (tree of genus Carpinus)

Declension[edit]


Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia pl

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *grab(r)ъ, from Proto-Indo-European *grābʰ-

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

grab m

  1. hornbeam, any tree of genus Carpinus.

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *grab(r)ъ, from Proto-Indo-European *grābʰ-

Noun[edit]

grab m (Cyrillic spelling граб)

  1. hornbeam

Declension[edit]