mast

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See also: Mast, MAST, masť, mást, måst, and mast-

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has articles on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English mast, from Old English mæst (mast), from Proto-West Germanic *mast, from Proto-Germanic *mastaz (mast, sail-pole), from Proto-Indo-European *mazdos (pole, mast). Cognate with Dutch mast, German Mast, and via Indo-European with Latin mālus, Russian мо́ст (móst, bridge), Irish adhmad.

Noun[edit]

mast (plural masts)

masts of a ship
  1. (nautical, communication, aviation) A tall, slim post or tower, usually tapering upward, used to support, for example, sails on a ship, the main rotor of a helicopter, flags, floodlights, meteorological instruments, or communications equipment, such as an aerial, usually supported by guy-wires (except in the case of a helicopter). [from 9th c.]
  2. (naval) A non-judicial punishment ("NJP"); a disciplinary hearing under which a commanding officer studies and disposes of cases involving those under his command. [from 17th c.]
Hyponyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

mast (third-person singular simple present masts, present participle masting, simple past and past participle masted)

  1. To supply and fit a mast to (a ship). [from 16th c.]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old English mæst (fallen nuts, food for swine), mæsten (to fatten, feed), from West Germanic; probably related to meat.

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Noun[edit]

mast (plural masts)

  1. The fruit of forest-trees (beech, oak, chestnut, pecan, etc.), especially if having fallen from the tree, used as fodder for pigs and other animals. [from 10th c.]
    • c. 1609, George Chapman, Homer, Prince of Poets [translation of Odyssey]:
      She shut them straight in sties, and gave them meat: / Oak-mast, and beech, and cornel fruit, they eat,
    • 1697, “The Second Book of the Georgics”, in John Dryden, transl., The Works of Virgil: Containing His Pastorals, Georgics, and Æneis. [], London: [] Jacob Tonson, [], OCLC 403869432, lines 755–756, page 93:
      The Winter comes, and then the falling Maſt, / For greedy Swine, provides a full repaſt.
    • 1715, Robert South, “A Sermon on Proverbs i. 32.”, in Twelve Sermons Preached at Several Times, and upon Several Occasions, volume IV, London: [] G. James, for Jonah Bowyer [], OCLC 863512731, pages 73–74:
      [T]hey feed and grovel like Swine under an Oak, filling themſelves with the Maſt, but never ſo much as looking up, either to the Bows that bore, or the Hands that ſhook it down.
    • 1955, Robin Jenkins, The Cone-Gatherers, Canongate 2012, page 162:
      He [] would begin to pick up the seed-cases or mast, squeeze each one with his fingers to see if it were fertile, and drop it if it were not.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

mast (third-person singular simple present masts, present participle masting, simple past and past participle masted)

  1. (of swine and other animals) To feed on forest seed or fruit.
  2. (agriculture, forestry, ecology, of a population of plants) To produce a very large quantity of fruit or seed in certain years but not others.
    • 1985, Michael Fenner, Seed ecology, page 33:
      Any individual tree which masted in a generally non-mast year would be subjected to the exclusive attention of the seed predators and so would be selected against.
    • 2004, Michael Scherer-Lorenzen, Christian Körner, Ernst-Detlef Schulze, Forest Diversity and Function: Temperate and Boreal Systems, page 28:
      However, if this were true, all or most masting species (e.g., Fagus and Quercus) in a forest would have to mast in synchrony to be effective against generalist herbivores.
    • 2008, Chris Rowthorn, Muhammad Cohen, China Williams, Borneo, page 50:
      Because dipterocarp seeds are winged and spin gracefully as they fall, the dispersal of millions of dipterocarp seeds during a masting event is one of the greatest spectacles that you can see on planet Earth.

Etymology 3[edit]

From French masse, with -t probably after Etymology 1, above.

Noun[edit]

mast (plural masts)

  1. (obsolete, billiards) A type of heavy cue, with the broad end of which one strikes the ball. [18th–19th c.]
    • 1751, Tobias Smollett, The Adventures of Peregrine Pickle, vol. II, ch. 74:
      Godfrey thus conquered, pretended to lose his temper, curs'd his own ill luck, swore that the table had a cast, and that the balls did not run true, changed his mast, and with great warmth challenged his enemy to double his sum.

Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Czech[edit]

Czech Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia cs

Etymology[edit]

From Old Czech mast, from Proto-Slavic *mastь.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mast f

  1. ointment

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • mast in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • mast in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Dutch mast, from Old Dutch *mast, from Proto-West Germanic *mast, from Proto-Germanic *mastaz.

Noun[edit]

mast m (plural masten, diminutive mastje n)

  1. mast (pole on a ship, to which sails can be rigged)
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Afrikaans: mas
  • Negerhollands: mast
  • Japanese: マスト

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle Dutch mast, from the root of met (meat), similar to German Mast.

Noun[edit]

mast m (plural masten, diminutive mastje n)

  1. mast, fodder for pigs or other animals made up of acorns and beechnuts.

Anagrams[edit]


Estonian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From either Middle Low German mast or German Mast.

Noun[edit]

mast (genitive masti, partitive masti)

  1. mast
  2. (card games) suit
  3. (poker) flush

Declension[edit]

Compounds[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Adjective[edit]

mast

  1. Alternative form of mased

Middle French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Old French mast

Noun[edit]

mast m (plural masts)

  1. mast (structure found on watercraft)

Descendants[edit]


Northern Kurdish[edit]

Noun[edit]

mast m

  1. yoghurt

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Low German mast (mast).

Noun[edit]

mast f or m (definite singular masta or masten, indefinite plural master, definite plural mastene)

  1. mast
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

mast

  1. past participle of mase

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Low German mast.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mast f (definite singular masta, indefinite plural master, definite plural mastene)

  1. mast

References[edit]


Old Czech[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *mastь.

Noun[edit]

mast f

  1. ointment

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • mast”, in Vokabulář webový: webové hnízdo pramenů k poznání historické češtiny [online][1], Praha: Ústav pro jazyk český AV ČR, 2006–2020

Old French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Frankish *mast.

Noun[edit]

mast m (oblique plural maz or matz, nominative singular maz or matz, nominative plural mast)

  1. mast (structure found on watercraft)

Descendants[edit]


Old Frisian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *maist, from Proto-Germanic *maist, *maistaz. Cognates include Old English mǣst and Old Saxon mēst.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

māst

  1. superlative degree of grāt

Adverb[edit]

māst

  1. most

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • Bremmer, Rolf H. (2009) An Introduction to Old Frisian: History, Grammar, Reader, Glossary, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, →ISBN, page 28

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *mastь (Russian масть (mastʹ), Polish maść). Compare mazati.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mȃst f (Cyrillic spelling ма̑ст)

  1. grease
  2. ointment
  3. fat
  4. lard
  5. schmaltz

Declension[edit]

References[edit]

  • mast” in Hrvatski jezični portal

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Low German mast, from Old Saxon *mast, from Proto-West Germanic *mast.

Noun[edit]

mast c

  1. mast, tall slim structure

Declension[edit]

Declension of mast 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative mast masten master masterna
Genitive masts mastens masters masternas

Anagrams[edit]


Zazaki[edit]

Noun[edit]

mast n

  1. yoghurt (a milk-based product thickened by a bacterium-aided curdling process)

Synonyms[edit]