masse

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Masse, massé, Maße, mâsse, and mäße

Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed via German Masse from Latin massa (lump, bulk), which is itself a loan from Ancient Greek μᾶζα (mâza, barley bread).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

masse c (singular definite massen, plural indefinite masser)

  1. mass, pulp (a shapeless, thick substance)
  2. (in the definite singular or plural) multitude, crowd, mob (an anonymous group of people)
    Synonyms: folkemasse, hob
  3. (determiner, in the indefinite singular or plural) many, loads, a lot, lots (in the singular with the other noun as an apposition, in the plural with the preposition af)
    Der var en masse mennesker på gaden.
    There were lots people in the streets.
    Jeg har masser af ideer.
    I have many ideas.
  4. (physics) mass (quantity of matter in a body)

Inflection[edit]

References[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /mas/
  • (file)

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin massa, from Ancient Greek μᾶζα (mâza, bread).

Noun[edit]

masse f (plural masses)

  1. a paste, a dough
  2. large amount or quantity of something; mass
  3. something perceived as a whole, without distinguishing its parts
  4. a sum or combination of things treated as a whole
  5. a majority, especially of people
  6. an archaic unit of count
  7. (finance, law) a sum of allotted money
  8. (physics) mass
  9. (electronics) earth, ground (of e.g. a plug)

Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

masse

  1. first-person singular present indicative of masser
  2. third-person singular present indicative of masser
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of masser
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of masser
  5. second-person singular imperative of masser

Etymology 3[edit]

From Old French mace, from Vulgar Latin *mattia, *mattea (compare Occitan massa, Catalan maça, Italian mazza, Spanish maza, Portuguese maça), probably derived from Latin mateola (hoe).

Noun[edit]

masse f (plural masses)

  1. mace (weapon)
  2. a sledgehammer
  3. thick end of a billiards cue, mace

Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Friulian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin magis.

Adverb[edit]

masse

  1. Too much

Italian[edit]

Noun[edit]

masse f pl

  1. plural of massa

Anagrams[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Anglo-Norman masse, from Latin massa, from Ancient Greek μᾶζα (mâza).

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

masse (plural massez)

  1. A lump, blob, or mass.
  2. A collection or mass of small objects that are fused together.
  3. (anatomy) blood (believed in medieval times to be a mixture of the four humours)
Related terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • English: mass
  • Scots: mass
  • Yola: messe
References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

masse

  1. Alternative form of messe

Etymology 3[edit]

Adjective[edit]

masse

  1. Alternative form of massy (massy)

Etymology 4[edit]

Noun[edit]

masse

  1. Alternative form of mace (mace)

Etymology 5[edit]

Noun[edit]

masse

  1. Alternative form of mase (a bewildering thought or thing)

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology[edit]

From Latin massa

Noun[edit]

masse m (definite singular massen, indefinite plural masser, definite plural massene)

  1. a mass

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

Etymology[edit]

From Latin massa

Noun[edit]

masse m (definite singular massen, indefinite plural massar, definite plural massane)

  1. a mass

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Old Irish[edit]

Noun[edit]

masse n

  1. Alternative spelling of maisse

Mutation[edit]

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
masse
also mmasse after a proclitic
masse
pronounced with /ṽ(ʲ)-/
unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.