earth

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Earth

English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

From Middle English erthe, from Old English eorþe (earth, ground, soil, dry land), from Proto-Germanic *erþō (earth, ground, soil) (compare West Frisian ierde, Low German Eerd, Dutch aarde, Dutch Low Saxon eerde, German Erde, Danish, Swedish and Norwegian jord), related to *erwô (earth) (compare Old High German ero, perhaps Old Norse jǫrfi (c)), from Proto-Indo-European *h₁er- (compare Ancient Greek *ἔρα (*éra) in ἔραζε (éraze, on the ground), perhaps Tocharian B yare (gravel).

Probably unrelated, and of unknown etymology, is Old Armenian երկիր (erkir, earth)). Likewise, the phonologically similar Proto-Semitic *ʾarṣ́- (whence Arabic أَرْض (ʾarḍ), Hebrew אֶרֶץ (ʾereṣ)) is probably not related.

Pronunciation[edit]

A view of Earth from space

Proper noun[edit]

earth

  1. Our planet, third out from the Sun; see main entry Earth.
    The astronauts saw the earth from the porthole.

Usage notes[edit]

  • The word earth is capitalized to Earth when used in context with other celestial bodies.

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

Earth as soil (1)

earth (countable and uncountable, plural earths)

  1. (uncountable) Soil.
    This is good earth for growing potatoes.
  2. (uncountable) Any general rock-based material.
    She sighed when the plane's wheels finally touched earth.
  3. The ground, land (as opposed to the sky or sea).
    • 2013 June 7, David Simpson, “Fantasy of navigation”, in The Guardian Weekly, volume 188, number 26, page 36:
      Like most human activities, ballooning has sponsored heroes and hucksters and a good deal in between. For every dedicated scientist patiently recording atmospheric pressure and wind speed while shivering at high altitudes, there is a carnival barker with a bevy of pretty girls willing to dangle from a basket or parachute down to earth.
    Birds are of the sky, not of the earth.
  4. (Britain) A connection electrically to the earth ((US) ground); on equipment: a terminal connected in that manner.
  5. A fox's home or lair.
  6. The world of our current life (as opposed to heaven or an afterlife).
    • 1819, John Keats, "Ode on a Grecian Urn"
      "Beauty is truth, truth beauty," - that is all / Ye know on earth, and all ye need to know.
  7. (alchemy, philosophy and Taoism) The aforementioned soil- or rock-based material, considered one of the four or five classical elements.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

See also[edit]

Verb[edit]

earth (third-person singular simple present earths, present participle earthing, simple past and past participle earthed)

  1. (Britain) To connect electrically to the earth.
    Synonym: ground
    That noise is because the amplifier is not properly earthed.
  2. To bury.
    • Young
      The miser earths his treasure, and the thief, / Watching the mole, half beggars him ere noon.
  3. (transitive) To hide, or cause to hide, in the earth; to chase into a burrow or den.
    • Dryden
      The fox is earthed.
  4. To burrow.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Tickell to this entry?)

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

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