tuna

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See also: Tuna and tuná

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Relative sizes of various tunas Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg tuna on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

From American Spanish alteration of the Spanish atún, from Arabic تُنّ(tunn, tuna) from Latin thunnus, itself from Ancient Greek θύννος (thúnnos), from θύνω (thúnō), "I rush, dart along").[1][2]

Noun[edit]

tuna (countable and uncountable, plural tuna or tunas)

  1. Any of several species of fish of the genus Thunnus in the family Scombridae.
    • 1887, John White, The Ancient History of the Maori, 84:
      Tuna was carried down by the flood; and when Maui saw him in the net he stretched forth his arm and with a blow of his stone axe smote Tuna and cut off his head, and it and the tail fell into the ocean. ... The head became fish, and the tail became the koiro (ngoiro—conger-eel).
  2. The edible flesh of the tuna.
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ tunn تُنّ” in Etymological Dictionary of Arabic, 2013–2020.
  2. ^ tuna, n.2”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1915.

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Taíno.

Prickly pear.

Noun[edit]

tuna (plural tunas)

  1. The prickly pear, a type of cactus native to Mexico in the genus Opuntia.
  2. The fruit of the cactus.
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Akawaio[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Carib *tuna.

Noun[edit]

tuna

  1. water
  2. rain

References[edit]

  • Journal of the Walter Roth Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, issue 13 (2001), page 12: "(Both Kapon and Pemon groups use tuna to mean "water", but Pemon employ konok which specifically means "rain" - a word which is lacking in the Akawaio language so that tuna is used to refer to rain and to water in general.)"

Apalaí[edit]

Noun[edit]

tuna

  1. water

See also[edit]

References[edit]


Bagua[edit]

Noun[edit]

tuna

  1. water

References[edit]

  • Aquiles, Pérez, Los puruhuayes, volume 2, page 314 (1970)
  • Willem F. H. Adelaar, The Languages of the Andes

Carijona[edit]

Noun[edit]

tuna

  1. (Carijona) water

Synonyms[edit]

References[edit]

  • Las lenguas indígenas de América y el español de Cuba (1993)

Cebuano[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Philippine *tuna, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *tuna, from Proto-Austronesian *tuNa.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Hyphenation: tu‧na

Noun[edit]

tuna

  1. The name of a small, glossy-black, worm-like snake, deadly poisonous, found in moist places in grasses and weeds, possibly the blind snake.

Chaima[edit]

Noun[edit]

tuna

  1. water

References[edit]

  • Bartolomé Tavera-Acosta, En el sur: (Dialectos indígenas de Venezuela) (1907), page 317

Chamorro[edit]

Verb[edit]

tuna

  1. (transitive) to laud, to praise

Cumanagoto[edit]

Noun[edit]

tuna

  1. water

References[edit]

  • Bartolomé Tavera-Acosta, En el sur: (Dialectos indígenas de Venezuela) (1907), page 317
  • Misiones jesuíticas en la Orinoquía (1625-1767) (1992, José del Rey Fajardo, ‎Universidad Católica del Táchira), page 573: agua Tam. tuna; Map. tuna; Yab. tuna; Chai, tuna; Cum. tuna;

Czech[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

tuna f

  1. ton (unit of weight)

Further reading[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

tuna

  1. third-person singular past historic of tuner

Galibi Carib[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Carib *tuna.

Noun[edit]

tuna

  1. water

References[edit]

  • The Languages of the Andes (2004, Willem F. H. Adelaar, Pieter C. Muysken)

Hixkaryana[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Carib *tuna.

Noun[edit]

tuna

  1. water

Usage notes[edit]

  • This term is obligatorily unpossessed.

References[edit]

  • Languages of the Amazon (2012, →ISBN, page 170

Indonesian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈtu.na]
  • Hyphenation: tu‧na

Etymology 1[edit]

From Arabic تُنَّ(tunna), تُنّ(tunn), from Latin thunnus, from Ancient Greek θύννος (thúnnos), from θύνω (thúnō, I rush, dart along).

Noun[edit]

tuna (plural, first-person possessive tunaku, second-person possessive tunamu, third-person possessive tunanya)

  1. tuna, any of several species of fish of the genus Thunnus in the family Scombridae.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Sanskrit तुणति (tuṇati, crooked).

Adjective[edit]

tuna

  1. damaged

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Macushi[edit]

Noun[edit]

tuna

  1. water

References[edit]

  • Bartolomé Tavera-Acosta, En el sur: (Dialectos indígenas de Venezuela) (1907), page 317
  • Alexandra Y. Aikhenvald, Languages of the Amazon (2012), page 188

Malay[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *tuna, from Proto-Austronesian *tuNa (freshwater eel).

Noun[edit]

tuna (Jawi spelling تونا‎, plural tuna-tuna, informal 1st possessive tunaku, impolite 2nd possessive tunamu, 3rd possessive tunanya)

  1. The name of a mudsnake or eel with a yellowish body, possibly the marbled eel, Anguilla marmorata.
    • 2015 December 6, Shaiful Shahrin Ahmad Pauzi, “Rezeki lampam mabuk menyerah diri [Pixilated tinfoil barb surrendered itself]”, in Berita Harian[1], archived from the original on 20 March 2016:
      Mohd Akhmal berkata, selain ikan lampam, seorang penduduk turut dapat menangkap seekor belut tuna seberat hampir tiga kilogram menggunakan jala.
      Mohd Akhmal said, besides a tinfoil barb, a resident has managed to catch a marbled eel weighing almost three kilograms using a net.

Hyponyms[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From English tuna.

Noun[edit]

tuna (Jawi spelling تونا‎, plural tuna-tuna, informal 1st possessive tunaku, impolite 2nd possessive tunamu, 3rd possessive tunanya)

  1. tuna, any of several species of fish of the genus Thunnus in the family Scombridae.

Hyponyms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Sanskrit तुणति (tuṇati, crooked).

Noun[edit]

tuna (plural tuna-tuna, informal 1st possessive tunaku, impolite 2nd possessive tunamu, 3rd possessive tunanya)

  1. wound

Adjective[edit]

tuna (plural tuna-tuna)

  1. damaged, flawed, injured

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Maori[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Polynesian *tuna, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *tuna, from Proto-Austronesian *tuNa (freshwater eel).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

tuna

  1. eel of various species, including the longfin eel (Anguilla dieffenbachii) and shortfin eel (Anguilla australis)

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • tuna” in John C. Moorfield, Te Aka: Maori-English, English-Maori Dictionary and Index, 3rd edition, Longman/Pearson Education New Zealand, 2011, →ISBN.

Mapoyo[edit]

Noun[edit]

tuna

  1. water

References[edit]

  • Bartolomé Tavera-Acosta, En el sur: (Dialectos indígenas de Venezuela) (1907), page 317
  • Misiones jesuíticas en la Orinoquía (1625-1767) (1992, José del Rey Fajardo, ‎Universidad Católica del Táchira), page 573: agua Tam. tuna; Map. tuna; Yab. tuna; Chai, tuna; Cum. tuna;

Maquiritari[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Carib *tuna.

Noun[edit]

tuna

  1. water
  2. river, watercourse

References[edit]

  • Ed. Key, Mary Ritchie and Comrie, Bernard. The Intercontinental Dictionary Series, Carib (De'kwana).

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Noun[edit]

tuna n

  1. definite plural of tun

Opón[edit]

Noun[edit]

tuna

  1. water

Synonyms[edit]

  • tuná-in'i /tuna-iño

References[edit]

  • Caminos de historia en el Carare-Opón (1999), page 254: Agua . . . Tuna
  • Boletín de la Academia Colombiana (1959): en el Opón-Karare: tuna

Panare[edit]

Noun[edit]

tuna

  1. Alternative form of tïna

References[edit]

  • Bartolomé Tavera-Acosta, En el sur: (Dialectos indígenas de Venezuela) (1907), page 317
  • Jean-Paul Dumont, Under the Rainbow: Nature and Supernature among the Panare (2014)
  • Marie-Claude Mattei Müller, Yoroko: a Panare shaman's confidences (1992), page 141

Pemon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Carib *tuna.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

tuna

  1. water

References[edit]

  • Journal of the Walter Roth Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, issue 13 (2001), page 12: "(Both Kapon and Pemon groups use tuna to mean "water", but Pemon employ konok which specifically means "rain" - a word which is lacking in the Akawaio language so that tuna is used to refer to rain and to water in general.)"
  1. ^ 2006, Katia Nepomuceno Pessoa, Fonologia Taurepang e comparação preliminar da fonologia de línguas do grupo Pemóng (família Caribe), Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, attachment 7.

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From tunar.

Verb[edit]

tuna

  1. third-person singular present indicative of tunar
  2. second-person singular imperative of tunar

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from Spanish tuna (singing group).

Noun[edit]

tuna f (plural tunas)

  1. (music) a college singing group, wearing ornate clothes
Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Pukapukan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Polynesian *tuna, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *tuna, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *tuna, from Proto-Austronesian *tuNa (freshwater eel).

Noun[edit]

tuna

  1. a kind of fish
  2. a striped lagoon eel, toothless and edible

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Purukotó[edit]

Zeichen 215 - Kreisverkehr, StVO 2000.svg A user suggests that this Purukotó entry be moved, merged or split, giving the reason: “to tuná”.
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Noun[edit]

tuná

  1. water

References[edit]

  • Vom Roraima zum Orinoco, volume 4
  • Revista andina, volume 11 (1993), page 451

Quechua[edit]

Noun[edit]

tuna

  1. prickly pear cactus (Opuntia) and its fruit

Declension[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin tonāre, present active infinitive of tonō, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *(s)tenh₂- (to thunder).

Verb[edit]

a tuna (third-person singular present tună, past participle tunat1st conj.

  1. to thunder
  2. to speak thunderously

Conjugation[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Samoan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Polynesian *tuna, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *tuna, from Proto-Austronesian *tuNa.

Noun[edit]

tuna

  1. eel

Sapará[edit]

Zeichen 215 - Kreisverkehr, StVO 2000.svg A user suggests that this Sapará entry be moved, merged or split, giving the reason: “to tu꞉ná”.
Please see the discussion on Requests for moves, mergers and splits(+) or the talk page for more information and remove this template after the request has been fulfilled.

Noun[edit]

tu꞉ná

  1. water

References[edit]

  • Vom Roraima zum Orinoco, volume 4
  • Revista andina, volume 11 (1993), page 451

Spanish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈtuna/, [ˈt̪una]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Taíno

Noun[edit]

tuna f (plural tunas)

  1. prickly pear, the fruit of the nopal cactus (Opuntia, especially Opuntia ficus-indica).
  2. nopal
Usage notes[edit]
  • Tuna is a false friend, and does not mean a kind of fish in Spanish. Spanish equivalents are shown above, in the "Translations" section of the English entry tuna.
Synonyms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From French tune, possibly from roi de Thunes (king of Tunis), a title used by leaders of vagabonds.

Noun[edit]

tuna f (plural tunas)

  1. (Spain) a college singing group, wearing ornate clothes, called in the Americas estudiantina
Descendants[edit]
  • Portuguese: tuna

Further reading[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Conjugated form of infinitive tunar

Verb[edit]

tuna

  1. This term needs a translation to English. Please help out and add a translation, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.

Swahili[edit]

Verb[edit]

tuna

  1. first-person plural present affirmative of -wa na

Tamanaku[edit]

Noun[edit]

tuna

  1. water

References[edit]

  • Bartolomé Tavera-Acosta, En el sur: (Dialectos indígenas de Venezuela) (1907), page 316-7
  • Misiones jesuíticas en la Orinoquía (1625-1767) (1992, José del Rey Fajardo, ‎Universidad Católica del Táchira), page 573: agua Tam. tuna; Map. tuna; Yab. tuna; Chai, tuna; Cum. tuna;

Trió[edit]

Noun[edit]

tuna

  1. water

Further reading[edit]

  • Eithne Carlin, A Grammar of Trio: A Cariban Language of Suriname (2004)

Wayana[edit]

Noun[edit]

tuna

  1. water

References[edit]


Wayumará[edit]

Zeichen 215 - Kreisverkehr, StVO 2000.svg A user suggests that this Wayumará entry be moved, merged or split, giving the reason: “to tuná”.
Please see the discussion on Requests for moves, mergers and splits(+) or the talk page for more information and remove this template after the request has been fulfilled.

Noun[edit]

tuná

  1. water

References[edit]

  • Vom Roraima zum Orinoco, volume 4
  • Revista andina, volume 11 (1993), page 451

Yabarana[edit]

Noun[edit]

tuna

  1. water

References[edit]

  • Bartolomé Tavera-Acosta, En el sur: (Dialectos indígenas de Venezuela) (1907), page 317
  • Misiones jesuíticas en la Orinoquía (1625-1767) (1992, José del Rey Fajardo, ‎Universidad Católica del Táchira), page 573: agua Tam. tuna; Map. tuna; Yab. tuna; Chai, tuna; Cum. tuna;