thon

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See also: Thon, thòn, thồn, þon, and -thon

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Proposed in 1858 by Charles Crozat Converse from that + one.[1]

Compare also dialectal English and Scots thon (that; yon, adjective; pronoun).

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

thon (third-person singular, gender-neutral, possessive thons, reflexive thonself)

  1. (nonstandard, rare, see usage notes) they (singular). Gender-neutral third-person singular subject pronoun, coordinate with gendered pronouns he and she.
    • 1889 November, Converse, C. Crozat, “That Desired Impersonal Pronoun”, in The Writer[1], volume 3, number 2, Boston: William H. Hills, page 248:
      Every writer has "thons" verbal likes and dislikes, yet, for the sake of convenience, I trust that even "thon" who dislikes verbal innovations will give my little word a little trial and note for me the result.
    • 1895, Williams, Henry Graham, Outlines of Psychology, 3rd edition, Syracuse: C. W. Bardee, OL 25083084M, LCC BF141.W12, page 5:
      Every student should acquaint thonself with some method by which thon can positively correlate the facts of thons knowledge.
    • 1907 August, Larisunz, C. W., “Thε Sol:—Hwens?—Hwither?”, in Thε Jurnɑl ɵv ɷrthɵεpi & ɷrthɵgrɑfi[2], volume 24, number 8, page 153:
      In everi individɥɑl then, ɑr thε elεments ɑut ɵv hwich everi sol haz pɑuer tu ɛlaborɞt ʊntu thonself hwɵtever cɵndishʊn thon dɛzɩrz — tu mɞc fɷr thonself heven ɷr hel, hwichever thon iz wiliŋ tu strɩv fɷr.
      In every individual then, are the elements out of which every soul has power to elaborate unto thonself whatever condition thon desires — to make for thonself heaven or hell, whichever thon is willing to strive for.
    • 1985, Zinsser, William Knowlton, On Writing Well: An Informal Guide to Writing Nonfiction[3], 3rd edition, New York: Harper & Row, →ISBN, LCCN 84048208, LCC PE1429.Z5 1985, page 121:
      Maybe I don't speak for the average American, but I very much doubt that thon wants that word in thons language or that thon would use it thonself.
  2. (nonstandard, rare, see usage notes) them (singular). Gender-neutral third-person singular object pronoun, coordinate with gendered pronouns him and her.
    • 1884 July 23, Converse, C. C., “A New Pronoun”, in The Critic and Good Literature[4], number 31, New York, page 55:
      If Mr. or Mrs. A. comes to the courthouse on Monday next I will be there to meet thon.
    • 2020, Charlie Kaufman, Antkind, →ISBN, page 102:
      I send my files to Dinsmore with a cutting note too subtle for thon to understand (thon is an imbecile, regardless of thon’s protected status).
Usage notes[edit]

A neologism when Charles Crozat Converse coined it in 1858, thon has seen limited use since then.

Synonyms[edit]
Hyponyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Quidnunc, “Thon—That's the Forewho”, American Speech, Volume 48, Number 3/4 (Autumn–Winter 1973), pages 300-302

Further reading[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Alteration of yon due to the influence of this and that.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

thon (not comparable)

  1. Yon.
    • 2010 December 17, Diana Gabaldon, A Breath of Snow and Ashes, Anchor Canada, →ISBN:
      “Whatever are ye lookin' at, Neil?” his mother demanded, looking up from fastening her favorite garnet brooch. “That's the third time ye've had a peek out thon window.” “Not a thing, Mam,” he said, inhaling deeply. “Only taking pleasure in the day. Such beautiful weather, is it not?” Mrs. Forbes sniffed, but obligingly settled her spectacles on []
    • 2011 January 4, Allie Mackay, Must Love Kilts, Penguin, →ISBN:
      “But”—he spoke in a tone that made Magnus feel like a lad of twelve—“look in the shadows of thon window embrasure and tell me what you see.” Magnus bit back a curse and followed the older man's gaze. “I see Maili, the smithy's daughter.”

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin thunnus, thynnus (itself from Ancient Greek θύννος (thúnnos)), possibly through the intermediate of Old Occitan ton.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

thon m (plural thons)

  1. tuna
  2. (derogatory) an ugly woman
    Synonyms: cageot, morue

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Romanian: ton
  • Turkish: ton

Further reading[edit]


Middle French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

First attested 1393 as ton. Borrowed from Latin thunnus, thynnus, possibly via Old Occitan ton although the Middle French is attested earlier than the Old Occitan[1].

Noun[edit]

thon m (plural thons)

  1. tuna (fish)

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Etymology and history of “thon”, in Trésor de la langue française informatisé [Digitized Treasury of the French Language], 2012.

Scots[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

thon (not comparable)

  1. Alternative form of yon

Pronoun[edit]

thon

  1. Alternative form of yon

Adverb[edit]

thon (not comparable)

  1. Alternative form of yon

Vietnamese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

thon (, , )

  1. tapering, tapered
  2. slender

Derived terms[edit]

Derived terms

Related terms[edit]