tune

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Tune, tuné, and -tune

English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

From Middle English tune, an unexplained variant of tone[1], from Old French ton, from Latin tonus, from Ancient Greek τόνος (tónos, a tone). Doublet of tone, ton, and tonus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

tune (countable and uncountable, plural tunes)

  1. A melody.
  2. A song, or short musical composition.
  3. (informal) The act of tuning or maintenance.
    Your engine needs a good tune.
  4. The state or condition of being correctly tuned.
    Your engine is now in tune.
    This piano is not in tune.
  5. (obsolete) Temper; frame of mind.
  6. (obsolete) A sound; a note; a tone.
  7. (obsolete) Order; harmony; concord.

Derived terms[edit]

Terms derived from tune (noun)

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Interjection[edit]

tune

  1. (Britain, slang) Used to show appreciation or approval of a song.
    You heard the new Rizzle Kicks song? — Tune!

Verb[edit]

tune (third-person singular simple present tunes, present participle tuning, simple past and past participle tuned)

  1. To adjust (a musical instrument) so that it produces the correct pitches.
    to tune a piano or a violin
    • 1568, William Cornishe [i.e., William Cornysh], “In the Fleete Made by Me William Cornishe otherwise Called Nyshwhete Chapelman with the Most Famose and Noble Kyng Henry the VII. His Reygne the XIX. Yere the Moneth of July. A Treatise betwene Trouth, and Information.”, in John Skelton; J[ohn] S[tow], editor, Pithy Pleasaunt and Profitable Workes of Maister Skelton, Poete Laureate, Imprinted at London: In Fletestreate, neare vnto Saint Dunstones Churche by Thomas Marshe, OCLC 54747393; republished as Pithy Pleasaunt and Profitable Workes of Maister Skelton, Poete Laureate to King Henry the VIIIth, London: Printed for C. Davis in Pater-noster Row, 1736, OCLC 731569711, page 290:
      The Harpe. [] A harper with his wreſt maye tune the harpe wrong / Mys tunying of an Inſtrument ſhal hurt a true ſonge
    • 1681, John Dryden, The Spanish Friar, or the Double Discovery, London: Richard Tonson & Jacob Tonson, Act II, p. 21,[1]
      She bids me hope; oh Heav’ns; she pities me!
      And pity still foreruns approching love;
      As Lightning does the Thunder! Tune your Harps
      Ye Angels to that sound []
  2. To adjust or modify (esp. a mechanical or electrical device) so that it functions optimally.
    Tuning the engine gave me an extra twenty horsepower.
    Tune your mind, and anything becomes possible.
  3. To adjust the frequency on a radio or TV set, so as to receive the desired channel.
    Tune to Channel 6 for all your favourite daytime shows.
  4. (e.g. of senses or faculties) To adapt to or direct towards a particular target.
    My ears were tuned to the sounds of the forest.
  5. To make more precise, intense, or effective; to put into a proper state or disposition.
  6. To attune; to adapt in style of music; to make harmonious.
    • 1645, John Milton, “The Passion” in Poems of Mr. John Milton, both English and Latin, London: Humphrey Moseley, p. 17,[2]
      For now to sorrow must I tune my song,
      And set my Harpe to notes of saddest wo,
  7. (transitive) To give a certain tone or character to.
  8. (obsolete) To sing with melody or harmony.
  9. (South Africa, slang, transitive) To cheek; to be impudent towards.
    Are you tuning me?

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Further reading[edit]

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

tune f (plural tunes)

  1. (slang) Alternative spelling of thune

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


German[edit]

Verb[edit]

tune

  1. inflection of tunen:
    1. first-person singular present
    2. first/third-person singular subjunctive I
    3. singular imperative

Middle English[edit]

Noun[edit]

tune

  1. Alternative form of toun

Ngarrindjeri[edit]

tune or sand

Noun[edit]

tune

  1. sand

Portuguese[edit]

Verb[edit]

tune

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of tunar
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of tunar
  3. first-person singular imperative of tunar
  4. third-person singular imperative of tunar

Romanian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

tune

  1. third-person singular present subjunctive of tuna
  2. third-person plural present subjunctive of tuna

Spanish[edit]

Verb[edit]

tune

  1. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of tunar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of tunar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of tunar.
  4. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of tunar.

Tarantino[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

tune (personal, second person singular)

  1. you

tune m (possessive, feminine toje)

  1. your