sense

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See also: Sense and sensé

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English sense, borrowed from Old French sens, sen, san (sense, reason, direction); partly from Latin sensus (sensation, feeling, meaning), from sentiō (feel, perceive); partly of Germanic origin (whence also Occitan sen, Italian senno), from Vulgar Latin *sennus (sense, reason, way), from Frankish *sinn (reason, judgement, mental faculty, way, direction). Both Latin and Germanic from Proto-Indo-European *sent- (to feel).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sense (countable and uncountable, plural senses)

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  1. Any of the manners by which living beings perceive the physical world: for humans sight, smell, hearing, touch, taste.
  2. Perception through the intellect; apprehension; awareness.
    a sense of security
  3. Sound practical or moral judgment.
    It's common sense not to put metal objects in a microwave oven.
  4. The meaning, reason, or value of something.
    You don’t make any sense.
    the true sense of words or phrases
  5. A natural appreciation or ability.
    A keen musical sense
  6. (pragmatics) The way that a referent is presented.
  7. (semantics) A single conventional use of a word; one of the entries for a word in a dictionary.
    The definition of sense in this context, is given in sense 7 of its definition.
  8. (mathematics) One of two opposite directions in which a vector (especially of motion) may point. See also polarity.
  9. (mathematics) One of two opposite directions of rotation, clockwise versus anti-clockwise.
  10. (biochemistry) referring to the strand of a nucleic acid that directly specifies the product.

Hyponyms[edit]

  • See also Thesaurus:sense
  • Derived terms[edit]

    Related terms[edit]

    Descendants[edit]

    • Afrikaans: sense

    Translations[edit]

    The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

    See also[edit]

    Verb[edit]

    sense (third-person singular simple present senses, present participle sensing, simple past and past participle sensed)

    1. To use biological senses: to either see, hear, smell, taste, or feel.
    2. To instinctively be aware.
      She immediately sensed her disdain.
    3. To comprehend.

    Translations[edit]

    The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

    Anagrams[edit]


    Afrikaans[edit]

    Etymology 1[edit]

    Borrowed from English sense.

    Noun[edit]

    sense (uncountable)

    1. sense, good sense

    Etymology 2[edit]

    Noun[edit]

    sense

    1. plural of sens

    Catalan[edit]

    Alternative forms[edit]

    Etymology[edit]

    Ultimately from Latin sine, possibly conflated with absentia, or more likely from sens, itself from Old Catalan sen (with an adverbial -s-), from Latin sine. Compare French sans, Occitan sens, Italian senza.

    Pronunciation[edit]

    Preposition[edit]

    sense

    1. without
      Antonym: amb

    Derived terms[edit]

    Further reading[edit]


    Chuukese[edit]

    Etymology[edit]

    Borrowed from Japanese 先生 (sensei).

    Noun[edit]

    sense

    1. teacher

    Latin[edit]

    Participle[edit]

    sēnse

    1. vocative masculine singular of sēnsus