terrier

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English[edit]

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Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowing from Middle French, from Old French chien terrier (terrier dog"or literally "earth dog) from chien (dog) + Old French terrier (from Medieval Latin terrarius (of earth) from Latin terra (earth)).

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

terrier (plural terriers)

  1. A dog from a group of small, lively breeds, originally bred for the hunting of burrowing prey such as rats, rabbits, foxes, and even otters; this original function is reflected in some of their names (e.g. rat terrier).
  2. (law, historical) A collection of acknowledgments of the vassals or tenants of a lordship, containing the rents and services they owed to the lord, etc.
  3. (law) A book or roll in which the lands of private persons or corporations are described by their site, boundaries, number of acres, etc.; a terrar.
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Coordinate terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Compare Latin terō (to rub, to rub away), terebra (a borer).

Noun[edit]

terrier (plural terriers)

  1. An auger or borer.

References[edit]

  • terrier” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2017.
  • Webster's Seventh New Collegiate Dictionary, Springfield, Massachusetts, G.&C. Merriam Co., 1967

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English terrier, from French (chien) terrier.

Noun[edit]

terrier c (singular definite terrieren, plural indefinite terriere)

  1. terrier (a small breed of dog)

Declension[edit]

References[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French, from Medieval Latin terrārius (of earth) from Latin terra (earth); or equivalent to terre +‎ -ier. Most terrier breeds were developed to hunt vermin both over and under the ground.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

terrier (feminine singular terrière, masculine plural terriers, feminine plural terrières)

  1. (archaic) relating to the ground, earth or land
  2. enumerating seignorial rights, notably in livre terrier (a register of land)

Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

terrier m (plural terriers)

  1. hole
  2. (fox's) earth; (rabbit) hole or burrow; (badger's) sett
  3. terrier (dog)
Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • Nouveau Petit Larousse illustré. Dictionnaire encyclopédique. Paris, Librairie Larousse, 1952, 146th edition

Anagrams[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English terrier, from French (chien) terrier.

Noun[edit]

terrier m (invariable)

  1. terrier (dog)

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English terrier, from French (chien) terrier.

Noun[edit]

terrier m f (plural terriers)

  1. terrier (a small breed of dog)

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English terrier, from French (chien) terrier.

Noun[edit]

terrier m (plural terriers)

  1. terrier (dog)