terra

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search
See also: Terra, terrà, tèrra, and Tèrra

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from Latin terra.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

terra ‎(plural terras or terrae)

  1. A rough upland or mountainous region of the moon with a relatively high albedo.

Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Provençal terra, from Latin terra, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *ters-(dry).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

terra f ‎(plural terres)

  1. earth
  2. land

Noun[edit]

terra m ‎(plural terres)

  1. ground

See also[edit]


Corsican[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin terra.

Noun[edit]

terra f ‎(plural terri)

  1. earth
  2. Earth

French[edit]

Verb[edit]

terra

  1. third-person singular past historic of terrer

Anagrams[edit]


Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese terra, from Latin terra.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

terra f ‎(plural terras)

  1. soil, earth
  2. land

See also[edit]


Interlingue[edit]

Noun[edit]

terra

  1. earth
  2. ground

Italian[edit]

Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia it

Etymology[edit]

From Latin terra, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *ters-(dry).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

terra f ‎(plural terre)

  1. earth
  2. ground
  3. soil

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *ters-(dry). Cognates include Old Irish (and Irish) tír, Ancient Greek τέρσομαι(térsomai), Sanskrit तृष्यति(tṛṣyati) and Old English þurst (English thirst).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

terra f ‎(genitive terrae); first declension

  1. ground, dry land
  2. earth, soil, dirt
  3. Earth's surface (dry land and sea together; as opposed to the heavens)
    • 29 bc, Vergil, Georgics, III
      omne adeo genvs in terris hominvmqve ferarvmqve
      et genvs æqvorevm pecvdes pictæqve volvcres
      in fvrias ignemqve rvvnt
      So far does every species on earth of man and beast,
      whether the aquatic species, livestock, or painted-winged,
      collapse into the frenzies and the fire [of sex].
  4. the world, the globe, earth as a celestial object
  5. a land, a region
    • ad 405, Jerome, Vulgate Bible, Dan. 1:2
      [] et asportavit ea in terram sennaar in domvm dei svi []
      [] which he carried into the land of Shinar to the house of his god []

Usage notes[edit]

The use of terra to describe the globe as a heavenly body was already established in antiquity, but (like Earth) gradually became treated as a proper noun Terra in New Latin as it became more indistinguishable from other planets and became treated as a simple name.

Declension[edit]

First declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative terra terrae
genitive terrae terrārum
dative terrae terrīs
accusative terram terrās
ablative terrā terrīs
vocative terra terrae

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • terra in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • terra in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • TERRA in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette, s.v.terra”.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • the earth; the glob: orbis terrae, terrarum
    • the continent: (terra) continens (B. G. 5. 8. 2)
    • an inland region; the interior: terra (regio) mediterranea
    • the earth brings forth fruit, crops: terra effert (more rarely fert, but not profert) fruges
    • the earth brings forth fruit abundantly: terra fundit fruges
    • the vegetable kingdom: ea, quae terra gignit
    • the vegetable kingdom: ea, quae e terra gignuntur
    • the vegetable kingdom: ea, quae a terra stirpibus continentur
    • the vegetable kingdom: ea quorum stirpes terra continentur (N. D. 2. 10. 26)
    • the atmosphere: aer terrae circumiectus or circumfusus
    • the atmosphere: aer qui est terrae proximus
    • a zone: orbis, pars (terrae), cingulus
    • to be contiguous, adjacent to a country: tangere, attingere terram
    • to be contiguous, adjacent to a country: finitimum esse terrae
    • to have the same boundaries; to be coterminous: continentem esse terrae or cum terra (Fam. 15. 2. 2)
    • the empire reaches to the ends of the world: imperium orbis terrarum terminis definitur
    • the most distant countries, the world's end: ultimae terrae
    • the most distant countries, the world's end: extremae terrae partes
    • to begin a journey (on foot, on horseback, by land): iter ingredi (pedibus, equo, terra)
    • to travel through the most remote countries: disiunctissimas ultimas terras peragrare (not permigrare)
    • to fall to the earth: in terram cadere, decidere
    • to sink into the earth: in terram demergi
    • to keep one's eyes on the ground: oculos figere in terra and in terram
    • geography: terrarum or regionum descriptio (geographia)
    • to conquer a country: terra potiri
    • to reduce a country to subjection to oneself: terram suae dicionis facere
    • to make oneself master of a people, country: populum, terram suo imperio, suae potestati subicere (not sibi by itself)
    • to disembark troops: milites in terram, in terra exponere
    • the storm drives some one on an unknown coast: procella (tempestas) aliquem ex alto ad ignotas terras (oras) defert
    • to land (of people): appellere navem (ad terram, litus)
    • to land, disembark: exire, egredi in terram
    • to be unable to land: portu, terra prohiberi (B. C. 3. 15)
  • terra in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • terra in William Smith, editor (1848) A Dictionary of Greek Biography and Mythology, London: John Murray

Neapolitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin terra.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

terra f (plural terre)

  1. land

Old Provençal[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin terra.

Noun[edit]

terra f ‎(oblique plural terras, nominative singular terra, nominative plural terras)

  1. land

Descendants[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese terra, from Latin terra, from Proto-Indo-European *ters-(dry).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

terra f (plural terras)

  1. land; region; territory (area associated with something)
    Cuidado, essa é a terra dos caçadores de cabeças.
    Be careful, this is the land of the headhunters.
  2. ground (the surface of the Earth outside buildings)
    Deixa essa pedra na terra.
    Leave this rock on the ground.
  3. land; property (partitioned and measurable area owned by someone)
    Compramos uma terra para criar gado.
    We bought land to raise cattle.
  4. (sailing) land; dry land; ground (places outside a body of water)
    Após meses de viagem, finalmente chegaram em terra.
    After months of travel, they finally arrived on land.
  5. earth; soil (mixture of sand and organic material found on the ground)
    Tua camisa está suja de terra.
    Your shirt is dirty with soil.
  6. land; homeland
    Lá na minha terra tem muitas capivaras.
    There are a lot of capybaras in my homeland.

Synonyms[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

terra f

  1. Alternative letter-case form of Terra

Verb[edit]

terra

  1. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present indicative of terrar
  2. second-person singular (tu, sometimes used with você) affirmative imperative of terrar

See also[edit]


Romansch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin terra.

Noun[edit]

terra f (plural terras)

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun, Puter) land, soil
  2. (Rumantsch Grischun, Puter) country, land
  3. (capitalized, proper noun, Rumantsch Grischun, Puter, Vallader) the planet Earth

Synonyms[edit]


Sicilian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin terra.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈtɛʐʐa/
  • Hyphenation: tèr‧ra

Noun[edit]

terra f (plural terri)

  1. land
  2. earth
  3. soil
  4. ground

Related terms[edit]