terror

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See also: Terror

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Old French terreur (terror, fear, dread), from Latin terror (fright, fear, terror), from terrēre (to frighten, terrify), from Proto-Indo-European *tre- (to shake), *tres- (to tremble).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

terror (countable and uncountable, plural terrors)

  1. (countable, uncountable) Intense dread, fright, or fear.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:fear
    • 1794, William Godwin, Things as they are; or, The adventures of Caleb
      The terrors with which I was seized [] were extreme.
    • 1963, C.L.R. James, The Black Jacobins, 2nd Revised edition, page 9:
      Fear of their cargo bred a savage cruelty into the crew. One captain, to strike terror into the rest, killed a slave and dividing heart, liver and entrails into 300 pieces made each of the slaves eat one, threatening those who refused with the same torture. Such incidents were not rare.
  2. (uncountable) The action or quality of causing dread; terribleness, especially such qualities in narrative fiction.
    • 1921, Edith Birkhead, The tale of terror: a study of the Gothic romance
  3. (countable) Something or someone that causes such fear.
    • 1788 June, Richard Brinsley Sheridan, “Mr. Sheridan’s Speech, on Summing Up the Evidence on the Second, or Begum Charge against Warren Hastings, Esq., Delivered before the High Court of Parliament, June 1788”, in Select Speeches, Forensick and Parliamentary, with Prefatory Remarks by N[athaniel] Chapman, M.D., volume I, [Philadelphia, Pa.]: Published by Hopkins and Earle, no. 170, Market Street, published 1808, OCLC 230944105, page 474:
      The Begums' ministers, on the contrary, to extort from them the disclosure of the place which concealed the treasures, were, [] after being fettered and imprisoned, led out on to a scaffold, and this array of terrours proving unavailing, the meek tempered Middleton, as a dernier resort, menaced them with a confinement in the fortress of Chunargar. Thus, my lords, was a British garrison made the climax of cruelties!
    • 1841, Ralph Waldo Emerson
      The terrors of the storm
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 1, in Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      A chap named Eleazir Kendrick and I had chummed in together the summer afore and built a fish-weir and shanty at Setuckit Point, down Orham way. For a spell we done pretty well. Then there came a reg'lar terror of a sou'wester same as you don't get one summer in a thousand, and blowed the shanty flat and ripped about half of the weir poles out of the sand.
  4. (uncountable) terrorism
    a terror attack; the War on Terror
    • 2019 July 15, Greg Afinogenov, “The Jewish Case for Open Borders”, in Jewish Currents[1], number Summer 2019:
      Rank-and-file progressives don’t usually think of the immigration policies they support—expanding refugee quotas, easing restrictions on some classes of immigrants, and ending family separation—as an endorsement of detention, deportation, and racialized terror.

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • terror at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • terror in Keywords for Today: A 21st Century Vocabulary, edited by The Keywords Project, Colin MacCabe, Holly Yanacek, 2018.
  • terror in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • terror in The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911.

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin terror, terrorem.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

terror m or f (plural terrors)

  1. terror, horror

Danish[edit]

Noun[edit]

terror c (singular definite terroren, not used in plural form)

  1. terror

References[edit]


Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin terror.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

terror m (plural terrores)

  1. terror
    Synonyms: espanto, horror, pavor

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • terror” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • terror” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • terror” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.

Hungarian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English terror, from Latin terror.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ ˈtɛrːor]
  • Hyphenation: ter‧ror
  • Rhymes: -or

Noun[edit]

terror (plural terrorok)

  1. terror (especially the action or quality of causing dread)
    Synonym: megfélemlítés

Declension[edit]

Inflection (stem in -o-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative terror terrorok
accusative terrort terrorokat
dative terrornak terroroknak
instrumental terrorral terrorokkal
causal-final terrorért terrorokért
translative terrorrá terrorokká
terminative terrorig terrorokig
essive-formal terrorként terrorokként
essive-modal
inessive terrorban terrorokban
superessive terroron terrorokon
adessive terrornál terroroknál
illative terrorba terrorokba
sublative terrorra terrorokra
allative terrorhoz terrorokhoz
elative terrorból terrorokból
delative terrorról terrorokról
ablative terrortól terroroktól
non-attributive
possessive - singular
terroré terroroké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
terroréi terrorokéi
Possessive forms of terror
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. terrorom terroraim
2nd person sing. terrorod terroraid
3rd person sing. terrora terrorai
1st person plural terrorunk terroraink
2nd person plural terrorotok terroraitok
3rd person plural terroruk terroraik

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Tótfalusi, István. Idegenszó-tár: Idegen szavak értelmező és etimológiai szótára (’A Storehouse of Foreign Words: an explanatory and etymological dictionary of foreign words’). Budapest: Tinta Könyvkiadó, 2005. →ISBN

Further reading[edit]

  • terror in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh: A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962.

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From terreō (frighten, terrify) +‎ -or.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

terror m (genitive terrōris); third declension

  1. a dread, terror, great fear, alarm, panic
  2. an object of fear or dread

Declension[edit]

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative terror terrōrēs
Genitive terrōris terrōrum
Dative terrōrī terrōribus
Accusative terrōrem terrōrēs
Ablative terrōre terrōribus
Vocative terror terrōrēs

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • terror in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • terror in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[2], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to inspire fear, terror: timorem, terrorem alicui inicere, more strongly incutere
    • terror, panic seizes some one: terror incidit alicui
    • terror, panic seizes some one: terror invadit in aliquem (rarely alicui, after Livy aliquem)
    • to overwhelm some one with terror: in terrorem conicere aliquem

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English terror, from Latin terror.

Noun[edit]

terror m (definite singular terroren, uncountable)

  1. terror

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English terror, from Latin terror.

Noun[edit]

terror m (definite singular terroren, uncountable)

  1. terror

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Etymology[edit]

From English terror, from Old French terreur (terror, fear, dread), from Latin terror (fright, fear, terror), from terrēre (to frighten, terrify).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

terror m inan

  1. (politics) terror (policy of political repression and violence intended to subdue political opposition)

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • terror in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • terror in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin terror, terrorem.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

terror m (plural terrores)

  1. terror (intense fear)
    • 2003, J. K. Rowling, Lya Wyler, Harry Potter e a Ordem da Fênix, Rocco, page 493:
      Os olhos do elfo se arregalavam de terror e ele tremia.
  2. (Brazil, slang) a very troublesome person or thing
    Você é um terror, garoto! - You're naughty, boy!
    Esses bandidos são um terror - Those criminals are terrible!

Quotations[edit]

For quotations using this term, see Citations:terror.

Derived terms[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin terror, terrorem[1].

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /teˈroɾ/, [t̪eˈroɾ]

Noun[edit]

terror m (plural terrores)

  1. horror (genre)
  2. terror

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Noun[edit]

terror c

  1. terror

Declension[edit]

Declension of terror 
Uncountable
Indefinite Definite
Nominative terror terrorn
Genitive terrors terrorns

Related terms[edit]