pavor

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Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Galician and Old Portuguese pavor (13th century, Cantigas de Santa Maria), from Latin pavor, pavōrem.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pavor m (plural pavores)

  1. (literary) dread
    Synonyms: espanto, horror, terror

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • pavor” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006-2012.
  • pavor” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • pavor” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • pavor” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From paveō (tremble or quake with fear).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pavor m (genitive pavōris); third declension

  1. The act of trembling, quaking, throbbing or panting with fear.
  2. Fear, alarm, terror, fright, panic.
  3. Fear through expectation, dread, thrill, anxiety, trepidation.

Usage notes[edit]

  • The old nominative singular form pavos is also found.

Declension[edit]

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative pavor pavōrēs
Genitive pavōris pavōrum
Dative pavōrī pavōribus
Accusative pavōrem pavōrēs
Ablative pavōre pavōribus
Vocative pavor pavōrēs

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • pavor in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • pavor in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • pavor in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • pavor in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • pavor in William Smith, editor (1848) A Dictionary of Greek Biography and Mythology, London: John Murray

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese pavor, from Latin pavor, pavōrem.

Pronunciation[edit]

 
  • IPA(key): (Brazil) /paˈvoʁ/, [paˈvoh]
    • IPA(key): (São Paulo) /paˈvoɾ/, [paˈvoɾ]
    • IPA(key): (Rio) /paˈvoʁ/, [paˈvoχ]
  • IPA(key): (Portugal) /pɐˈvoɾ/, [pɐˈvoɾ]

  • Hyphenation: pa‧vor
  • Rhymes: -oɾ, -oʁ

Noun[edit]

pavor m (plural pavores)

  1. intense fear, dread
    Synonyms: horror, medo

Derived terms[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin pavōrem, singular accusative of pavor. It may be a semi-learned term in its current form, preserving the intervocalic 'v' unlike other non-Iberian Romance cognates (compare the attested Old Spanish form paor); descendants of Latin metus (e.g. Spanish miedo) were the primary words for "fear" on the Iberian peninsula. See also the dialectal pavura, with a change of suffix as with Italian paura.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /paˈboɾ/, [paˈβ̞oɾ]
  • Hyphenation: pa‧vor

Noun[edit]

pavor m (plural pavores)

  1. dread, fright, fear
    Synonyms: miedo, temor, horror

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

References[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Noun[edit]

pavor

  1. indefinite plural of pava