horror

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See also: Horror

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Alternative forms[edit]

  • horrour (UK, hypercorrect spelling or archaic)

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English horer, horrour, from Old French horror, from Latin horror (a bristling, a shaking, trembling as with cold or fear, terror), from horrere (to bristle, shake, be terrified).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

horror (countable and uncountable, plural horrors)

  1. (countable, uncountable) An intense distressing emotion of fear or repugnance.
  2. (countable) An intense dislike or aversion; an abhorrence.
  3. (uncountable) A genre of fiction meant to evoke a feeling of fear and suspense.
    • 1898 July 3, Philadelphia Inquirer, page 22:
      The Home Magazine for July (Binghamton and New York) contains ‘The Patriots' War Chant,’ a poem by Douglas Malloch; ‘The Story of the War,’ by Theodore Waters; ‘A Horseman in the Sky,’ by Ambrose Bierce, with a portrait of Mr. Bierce, whose tales of horror are horrible of themselves, not as war is horrible; ‘A Yankee Hero,’ by W. L. Calver; ‘The Warfare of the Future,’ by Louis Seemuller; ‘Florence Nightingale,’ by Susan E. Dickenson, with two rare portraits, etc.
    • 1917 February 11, New York Times, Book reviews, page 52:
      Those who enjoy horror, stories overflowing with blood and black mystery, will be grateful to Richard Marsh for writing ‘The Beetle.’
    • 1947, Dracula (1931) re-release poster, tagline:
      A Nightmare of Horror!
  4. Something horrible; that which excites horror.
    I saw many horrors during the war.
  5. (colloquial) A nasty or ill-behaved person; a rascal or terror.
    The neighbour's kids are a pack of little horrors!
  6. (informal) An intense anxiety or a nervous depression; this sense can also be spoken or written as the horrors.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Further reading[edit]


Hungarian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin horror.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈhorːor]
  • Hyphenation: hor‧ror

Noun[edit]

horror (plural horrorok)

  1. horror

Declension[edit]

Inflection (stem in -o-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative horror horrorok
accusative horrort horrorokat
dative horrornak horroroknak
instrumental horrorral horrorokkal
causal-final horrorért horrorokért
translative horrorrá horrorokká
terminative horrorig horrorokig
essive-formal horrorként horrorokként
essive-modal
inessive horrorban horrorokban
superessive horroron horrorokon
adessive horrornál horroroknál
illative horrorba horrorokba
sublative horrorra horrorokra
allative horrorhoz horrorokhoz
elative horrorból horrorokból
delative horrorról horrorokról
ablative horrortól horroroktól
Possessive forms of horror
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. horrorom horroraim
2nd person sing. horrorod horroraid
3rd person sing. horrora horrorai
1st person plural horrorunk horroraink
2nd person plural horrorotok horroraitok
3rd person plural horroruk horroraik
Possessive forms of horror
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. horrorom horrorjaim
2nd person sing. horrorod horrorjaid
3rd person sing. horrorja horrorjai
1st person plural horrorunk horrorjaink
2nd person plural horrorotok horrorjaitok
3rd person plural horrorjuk horrorjaik

References[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From horreo +‎ -or.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

horror m (genitive horrōris); third declension

  1. bristling (standing on end)
  2. shaking, shivering, chill
  3. dread, terror, horror

Inflection[edit]

Third declension.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative horror horrōrēs
Genitive horrōris horrōrum
Dative horrōrī horrōribus
Accusative horrōrem horrōrēs
Ablative horrōre horrōribus
Vocative horror horrōrēs

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]


Old French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin horror, horrorem.

Noun[edit]

horror f (oblique plural horrors, nominative singular horror, nominative plural horrors)

  1. horror or terror

Descendants[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin horror, horrorem.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

horror m (plural horrores)

  1. horror

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin horror, horrorem.

Cf. also the popular Old Spanish horrura, inherited from a derivative of the Latin or with a change of suffix, and taking on the meaning of "dirtiness, filth, impurity, scum"; comparable to derivatives of horridus in other Romance languages[1], like Italian ordo, Old French ord, French ordure, Old Catalan hòrreu, horresa, Old Occitan orre, orrezeza, Romanian urdoare.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

horror m (plural horrores)

  1. horror

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]