ord

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See also: Ord and òrd

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Noun[edit]

ord

  1. Abbreviation of order.
  2. (law) Abbreviation of ordinance.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English ord, from Old English ord ‎(point, spear-point, spear, source, beginning, front, vanguard), from Proto-Germanic *uzdaz ‎(point), from Proto-Indo-European *wes- ‎(to stick, prick, pierce, sting) + Proto-Indo-European *dʰe- ‎(to set, place). Cognate with North Frisian od ‎(tip, place, beginning), Dutch oord ‎(place, region), German Ort ‎(location, place, position), Danish od ‎(a point), Swedish udd ‎(a point, prick), Icelandic oddur ‎(tip, point of a weapon, leader). See also odd.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

ord ‎(plural ords)

  1. (now chiefly UK dialectal) A point.
  2. (now chiefly UK dialectal) A point of origin; a beginning.
    • 1897, Frank Cowan, The millionaire:
      "[...] But such is life — hard upon hard from ord to end; and if I had not been made of the best of neat-leather, the longer in water the tougher, I would have melted away with my tears long ago!"
    • 1924, Esmoreit, Adriaan Jacob Barnouw, An ingenious play of Esmoreit: the king's son of Sicily:
      [...] Tell me wholly as it was From ord to end how it did pass When first your father was of me ware.
  3. (now chiefly UK dialectal) A point of land; a promontory.
    • 1900, Cai.:
      When a man came from Sutherland into Caithness over the Ord [of Caithness, in the southern tip of the county], he was called an ord-louper .
  4. (now chiefly UK dialectal) The point or edge of a weapon.
    Saul drew his sword, And ran even upon the ord. — Cursor Mundi.
    And touched him with the spear's ord. — Romance of Sir Otuel.
    • 1814, Henry William Weber, Robert Jamieson, Sir Walter Scott, Illustrations of northern antiquities:
      Hadubraht, the son of Hiltibrant, said, "Gladly gifts should be received; ord (spear's point) against ord.
Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Danish Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia da

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse orð, from Proto-Germanic *wurdą, from Proto-Indo-European *werdʰo- ‎(word).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ord n (singular definite ordet, plural indefinite ord)

  1. A word.

Inflection[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Irish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Irish ord, ordd.

Noun[edit]

ord m ‎(genitive singular oird, nominative plural oird)

  1. sledgehammer
Declension[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Irish ord, ordd, from Latin ōrdō.

Noun[edit]

ord m ‎(genitive singular oird, nominative plural oird)

  1. (religion, agriculture, etc.) order
  2. sequence, arrangement
  3. (literary) ordered manner, rule
  4. (literary) function
  5. (ecclesiastical) prescribed form of service
Declension[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Eclipsis with h-prothesis with t-prothesis
ord n-ord hord t-ord
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English ord. Akin to Old Frisian ord ‎(place, point), Old Saxon ord ‎(point), Old High German ort ‎(point, beginning), Old Norse oddr ‎(point of a weapon). More at odd

Noun[edit]

ord

  1. a point
  2. the point of a weapon
  3. a point of origin, beginning

Descendants[edit]


Norwegian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse orð, from Proto-Germanic *wurdą, from Proto-Indo-European *werdʰo- ‎(word). Cognates include Danish ord, Swedish ord, German Wort, and English word.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ord n

  1. word (a distinct unit of language with a particular meaning)
    Jeg forstår ikke dette ordet.
    I can’t understand this word.
  2. word (something promised)
    Jeg gir deg mitt ord på at jeg skal være der i tide.
    I give you my word that I will be there on time.
  3. word (a discussion)
    Kunne vi få et ord med deg?
    Could we have a word with you?
  4. reputation
    Han har godt ord på seg.
    He has a good reputation.
  5. (definite singular only) a permission to speak
    Jeg overlater ordet til min kollega.
    I’ll let my colleague speak.

Inflection[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Proto-Germanic *uzdaz, from Proto-Indo-European *wes- ‎(stab). Cognates with Middle Dutch ort (Dutch oord), Old High German ort (German Ort), Old Norse oddr (Icelandic oddur, Swedish udd, Danish od).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ord m

  1. point (especially of a weapon)
  2. point of origin, beginning
  3. front; vanguard, chief

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Romansch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin foras de

Adverb[edit]

ord

  1. outside

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse orð, from Proto-Germanic *wurdą, from Proto-Indo-European *werdʰo- ‎(word).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ord n ‎(plural ord, definite singular ordet, definite plural orden)

  1. (linguistics) word; A distinct unit of language (sounds in speech or written letters) with a particular meaning, composed of one or more morphemes, and also of one or more phonemes that determine its sound pattern.
  2. Something promised.
  3. (computing) A numerical value with a bit width native to the machine.

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]