ord

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See also: Ord, òrd, and orð

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Noun[edit]

ord

  1. Abbreviation of order.
  2. (law) Abbreviation of ordinance.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English ord, from Old English ord (point, spear-point, spear, source, beginning, front, vanguard), from Proto-Germanic *uzdaz (point), from Proto-Indo-European *wes- (to stick, prick, pierce, sting) + *dʰeh₁- (to set, place). Cognate with North Frisian od (tip, place, beginning), Dutch oord (place, region), German Ort (location, place, position), Danish od (a point), Swedish udd (a point, prick), Icelandic oddur (tip, point of a weapon, leader). See also odd.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

ord (plural ords)

  1. (now chiefly Britain dialectal) A point.
  2. (now chiefly Britain dialectal) A point of origin; a beginning.
    • 1897, Frank Cowan, The millionaire:
      "[...] But such is life — hard upon hard from ord to end; and if I had not been made of the best of neat-leather, the longer in water the tougher, I would have melted away with my tears long ago!"
    • 1924, Esmoreit, Adriaan Jacob Barnouw, An ingenious play of Esmoreit: the king's son of Sicily:
      [...] Tell me wholly as it was From ord to end how it did pass When first your father was of me ware.
  3. (now chiefly Britain dialectal) A point of land; a promontory.
    • 1900, Cai.:
      When a man came from Sutherland into Caithness over the Ord [of Caithness, in the southern tip of the county], he was called an ord-louper .
  4. (now chiefly Britain dialectal) The point or edge of a weapon.
    Saul drew his sword, And ran even upon the ord. — Cursor Mundi.
    And touched him with the spear's ord. — Romance of Sir Otuel.
    • 1814, Henry William Weber, Robert Jamieson, Sir Walter Scott, Illustrations of northern antiquities:
      Hadubraht, the son of Hiltibrant, said, "Gladly gifts should be received; ord (spear's point) against ord.
Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Danish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia da

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse orð, from Proto-Germanic *wurdą, from Proto-Indo-European *werdʰo- (word).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ord n (singular definite ordet, plural indefinite ord)

  1. word

Inflection[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Irish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Irish ord, ordd.

Noun[edit]

ord m (genitive singular oird, nominative plural oird)

  1. sledgehammer
    • 1899, Franz Nikolaus Finck, Die araner mundart, Marburg: Elwert’sche Verlagsbuchhandlung, vol. II, p. 12:
      kā giŕcr̥ ə dæšḱə n t-aurd ə viəs agī ə bŕišə nə glox?
      conventional orthography: Cá gcuirtear i dtaisce an t-ord a bhíos agaibh a briseadh na gcloch?
      Where is the sledgehammer you have for breaking the rocks kept?
    • 1899, Franz Nikolaus Finck, Die araner mundart, Marburg: Elwert’sche Verlagsbuchhandlung, vol. II, p. 12:
      fāȷīš nə h-aurȷ.
      conventional orthography: Faighidís na hoird.
      Let them fetch the sledgehammers.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Irish ord, ordd, from Latin ōrdō.

Noun[edit]

ord m (genitive singular oird, nominative plural oird)

  1. (religion, agriculture, etc.) order
  2. sequence, arrangement
  3. (literary) ordered manner, rule
  4. (literary) function
  5. (ecclesiastical) prescribed form of service
Derived terms[edit]

Declension[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Eclipsis with h-prothesis with t-prothesis
ord n-ord hord t-ord
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English ord. Akin to Old Frisian ord (place, point), Old Saxon ord (point), Old High German ort (point, beginning), Old Norse oddr (point of a weapon). More at odd

Noun[edit]

ord

  1. a point
  2. the point of a weapon
  3. a point of origin, beginning

Descendants[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse orð, from Proto-Germanic *wurdą, from Proto-Indo-European *werdʰo- (word). Cognates include Danish ord, Swedish ord, German Wort, and English word.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ord n (definite singular ordet, indefinite plural ord, definite plural orda or ordene)

  1. a word (a distinct unit of language with a particular meaning)
    Jeg forstår ikke dette ordet.
    I can’t understand this word.
  2. word (something promised)
    Jeg gir deg mitt ord på at jeg skal være der i tide.
    I give you my word that I will be there on time.
  3. word (a discussion)
    Kunne vi få et ord med deg?
    Could we have a word with you?
  4. reputation
    Han har godt ord på seg.
    He has a good reputation.
  5. (definite singular only) permission to speak
    Jeg overlater ordet til min kollega.
    I’ll let my colleague speak.

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse orð, from Proto-Germanic *wurdą, from Proto-Indo-European *werdʰo- (word). Akin to English word.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ord n (definite singular ordet, indefinite plural ord, definite plural orda)

  1. a word (a distinct unit of language with a particular meaning)

Derived terms[edit]

For other terms please refer to ord (Bokmål) above.

References[edit]


Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *uzdaz, from Proto-Indo-European *wes- (stab). Cognates with Middle Dutch ort (Dutch oord), Old High German ort (German Ort), Old Norse oddr (Icelandic oddur, Swedish udd, Danish od).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ord m (nominative plural ordas)

  1. point (especially of a weapon)
  2. point of origin, beginning
  3. front; vanguard, chief

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Romansch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin foras de.

Adverb[edit]

ord

  1. outside

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse orð, from Proto-Germanic *wurdą, from Proto-Indo-European *werdʰo- (word).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ord n (plural ord, definite singular ordet, definite plural orden)

  1. (linguistics) word; A distinct unit of language (sounds in speech or written letters) with a particular meaning, composed of one or more morphemes, and also of one or more phonemes that determine its sound pattern.
  2. Something promised.
  3. (computing) A numerical value with a bit width native to the machine.

Declension[edit]

Declension of ord 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative ord ordet ord orden
Genitive ords ordets ords ordens

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]